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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These were 2 frames from the brood chamber that had no actual brood on it. Also was never subjected to chemicals.

"Survival" extractor - that would be my homemade extractor. The extractor looks terrible but it works.
I have to still strain the honey before I know how much I got from the 2 frames.

I got carried away with the drill and blew the centers out. Would have been easier if the drill had a speed dial on it.

If I stick the blown out frames back on the hives will they clean up the broken wax and deformed cells and build it right? Or should I cut out all the blown out sections and then give it back to them?

Also - Do bees ever cap pollen with honey stored above it? I noticed a few cells with dark pasty "stuff" but honey mixed into it.

Mike
 

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The bees will fix the comb whether you cut it out or leave it. Might not look good but hey, they'll make it work.

That dark pasty stuff you found is probably bee bread. Pollen mixed with honey. The bees eat it.

Bishop
 

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"...if the drill had a speed dial on it..."
look on e-bay for a "router speed control"
good luck,mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Any photos of the "survivor" extractor?
It's good for a laugh... :rolleyes:

It cost about $17 (for the buckets #2 HDPE, pretty common at hardware stores. Thanks Barry for the info on the plastics -and- center threaded rod with bolts etc..).
The rest was scrap wood I had. Any wooden parts that are inside were made from new wood. Parts were cleaned well with bleach, and rinsed well.

It is basically a wood framework that holds two 5 gallon buckets together. The bottom of the top bucket is cut off for access to the inside. The cut off bottom has a hole drilled through it's center and is flipped over and fits snugly inside the now open bottom (which is of course the top now). The rod protrudes through this hole and keeps the top in alignment with the bottom (a block of wood to re-enforce this area would help).

2x4s make up a base on which the bottom bucket sits. A block of clean maple with a hole drilled in the center (to accept the center rod) is screwed down inside the bucket. I used beeswax to seal the holes to prevent any leaking.

A wooden framework is bolted to the threaded rod and accepts the frames.

It looks "bodged" together because I wasn't wanting to spend a lot of time on it unless it worked. I can go back and clean up the edges and refine it.



This is the extractor with drill on it.



Close up of buckets and their mounting frames.


Looking down into it. You can see the maple block.

.. continued in next post... (picture limit)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Framework to hold the frames on the center rod. Bolts, washers, lockwashers keep the framework from siply spinning on the rod. This pic shows it with a sample frame in it. The tope framework is tightened down until enough pressure is placed on the frame to keep it from moving. I think if I had a second set of cuts in the framework it might fit 3 meds in (not sure).


This is the "spinner" framework inside the buckets.

Thats it. Doesn't look nice but it did work.
Everything there should pass USDA :lookout: (though I would only use it for my own personal needs).

I didn't have any gasket between the buckets and some honey got out (just a tiny amount). I had though of placing a bead of DAP caulking on the lip of the top bucket to form a gasket and still may (DAP says it is good for food contact once dry - not all their caulkings may be though).

Mike
 
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