Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,822 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I saw in a article in ABJ awhile back about someone growing Eucalyptus here in the US. I was wondering if there is a good source of information on growing it here and where to get seeds or plants in bulk. If there are any guys from down under that could recommend a good variety that would be good also.
Thanks
Kingfisher
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Eucalyptus is very common in California, having been planted there back in the 1800s. There are dozens of varieties, most of which are phenomenal honey plants. One beekeeper in Point Loma told me his bees worked it every day of the year, and typically averaged 300 pounds a year.

I used to run 400+ hives in San Diego County and could basically count on 40,000 pounds of honey per year, without pushing the bees (no annual requeening, etc). We also got 4000 pounds of bee pollen a year, and I raised queen cells for sale, all off the eucalyptus flows.

See also:

Ormond Aebi (1916 - July 2004) was a beekeeper who was reported to have set the world's record for honey obtained from a single hive in one year, 1974, when 404 pounds of honey were harvested, breaking an unofficial 80 year-old record of 303 pounds held by A. I. Root. Together with his father Harry, the Aebis wrote two books on beekeeping: The Art and Adventure of Beekeeping (1975) and Mastering the Art of Beekeeping (1979) (both currently out-of-print).

The Aebis lived in Santa Cruz, CA.


PLB
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Here in SW Louisiana, timber companies and land owners are planting hundreds of acres of Eucalyptus trees. The nearest to me is about 5 miles as the bee flies.

Timber companies are looking for "super fast" growing trees, but I don't know how they can outgrow pine trees here. These pines planted here need thinning in just a short time and ready to harvest really soon.

We also have huge amounts of tallow trees here, but the farmers and ranchers don't care for them. Another thing about tallow trees, they are gorgous in the fall, the leave colors.

Best,

casper_zip
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,649 Posts
The Bkue gum was planted in northern California for lumber. And, it was abandoned because the wood grain is not straight.
There are two rest stops on I-5 that use the gums for their shade.
There are over 300 species of Eucalyptus.
Ernie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
what variety of Eucalyptus is planted in California and does anyone know where seeds or plants can be obtained

Thanks Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,487 Posts
There are at least 40 different varieties of euc growing in my area. Some bloom very early in the year with white flowers, good for build up. Some are blooming now with red flowers.
I don't know if all varieties are worked by the bees or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
does Eucalyptus globulus produce a good flow
do all Eucalyptus provide a good flow

was thinking of getting some and wanted one with good nectar flow


Thanks David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
From Wikipedia:

One way in which the eucalyptus, mainly the ******** E. globulus, proved valuable in California was in providing windbreaks for highways, orange groves, and other farms in the mostly treeless central part of the state. They are also admired as shade and ornamental trees in many cities and gardens.

Eucalyptus forests in California have been criticised because they compete with native plants and do not support native animals. Fire is also a problem. The 1991 Oakland Hills firestorm which destroyed almost 3,000 homes and killed 25 people was partly fueled by large numbers of eucalypts close to the houses.[17]

In some parts of California, eucalypt forests are being removed and native trees and plants restored.

Many people consider these a "nuisance" tree. They're hugely messy, dropping flowers, seedpods, and tons of stringy bark all over the place. They smell like a mixture of Vick's Vapo-Rub and cat pee. They are allopathic, and crowd out/poison other plants. The ground under one of these trees is usually a barren wasteland.

So, no. I wouldn't plant these trees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,822 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Many people consider these a "nuisance" tree. They're hugely messy, dropping flowers, seedpods, and tons of stringy bark all over the place. They smell like a mixture of Vick's Vapo-Rub and cat pee. They are allopathic, and crowd out/poison other plants. The ground under one of these trees is usually a barren wasteland.

So, no. I wouldn't plant these trees.
I already have some eucalyptus saplings. I can take the Vicks smell, and I already have a cat that marks all the stuff around here, not to mention a crape Myrtle that is shedding all over the place. Also we have acreage that we can plant them on far away from the house. Most of the ground under the native pines is barren too.

Kingfisher
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,822 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Joseph, what is the best variety for bees? I looked at their site and I got lost in the amount of different ones. HELP!

Kingfisher
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
"
Many people consider these a "nuisance" tree. They're hugely messy, dropping flowers, seedpods, and tons of stringy bark all over the place. They smell like a mixture of Vick's Vapo-Rub and cat pee. They are allopathic, and crowd out/poison other plants. The ground under one of these trees is usually a barren wasteland."

I feel insulted!! I live in Eucalypt country. There are many hundreds of Euc's and not all are good honey producers and many are not good producers every year.
Don't plant Euc's if you don't live in Australia. They are excellent in making use of any water which is available. The will burn very hot in a fire and they do indeed have other characteristics you may not find attractive.

If you have them growing in your area I hope you will enjoy the honey.

A good book you may find in your Library is " The Honey Flora of Queensland" - it will tell you which Euc's are the best and which ones produce the best honey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Whoops, I was giving advice to an American beekeeper, and came off sound like a boor.

These trees have no natural place in the American ecosystem, and many have become invasive pests, crowding out native trees.

And, indeed, they burn ferociously.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,822 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
These trees have no natural place in the American ecosystem, and many have become invasive pests, crowding out native trees.
Beekeepers plant all kinds of things that are not native, Vitex is a example. In fact, the invasive ones seem to be the ones that produce the most honey.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
I guess the question is if you care more about your short term honey production or long term changes to the planet?

Non native plants are fine for non native honey bees, but may offer no food to local creatures.

It's just one more thing to consider.

And *seriously* listen to me when i say that eucalypts are a *major* pest in my part of the country.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
" And *seriously* listen to me when i say that eucalypts are a *major* pest in my part of the country."

....and I believe you - I have seen them all around the planet. Don't plant them but if you have them enjoy the honey. People argue about the " best" but one very good one is E. melliodora. It is not the best for timber and has not been planted as widely as others but it is considered one of the best bee trees here.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top