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I made my very first swarm trap the other day. 10 frame deep. I need to know where to hang it, how to bait it, and other essentials to swarm trapping. Thanks so much for the help!
 

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Ok great! If I know of a swarm that I am targeting, where should I put the trap? And should I use the "Queen Juice" pheromone in addition to the lemon grass oil?
 

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Hmmm.

Swarms usually don't hang around in one place all that long.

If you mean that you are hoping to trap a swarm that might come from a specific established hive/colony, there are no fixed answers. If you only have one trap I would say that the odds are low that a swarm from a specific hive will move into your trap. But the good news is that a swarm from a colony that you don't even know about might move in. Set out as many traps as you can to improve your odds.
 

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I suggest you get on YOUTUBE and search for honeybee swarm trap + Jason Bruns. Mr. Bruns has some excellent videos on swarm traps.

Phil
 

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I suggest you get on YOUTUBE and search for honeybee swarm trap + Jason Bruns. Mr. Bruns has some excellent videos on swarm traps.

Phil
How do you reset the bees when moving a caught swarm to it's final resting place? For instance, i'd like to set traps around my property/neighborhood - about 3 acres of land, then once caught - move them to where I keep all my hives.

I was under the impression that they needed to be 'reset' unless you are moving them over a mile away.

Would a caught swarm need to be relocated for a week (more than a mile away) then brought back?

Thanks,
 

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Wait Wait I'm confussed lol

"Resetting bee's that I catch in a swarm trap?

I have SO FAR have Swarm Traps at 1 1/2 mile from my home and one 5+ miles from my home ; am I to assume dat I have to reset or keep them in a screened box of some sort before I put them into my hive or they will go back to where they came from?

I thought they went into my swarm trap to bee happy and multiply?

What does a leafy branch do for helping the transition?

Thanks
 

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By resetting they mean orienting to the new location . Screening them in for a few days makes them forget where they were at. By putting the leafy branch in front and make them reorient to their new location as the surrounding is different. That's the basics of moving the bees a short distance and having the orient to their new location. Or you can move the whole hive a few miles away for a few days and then put them where you want them.
 

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By resetting they mean orienting to the new location . Screening them in for a few days makes them forget where they were at. By putting the leafy branch in front and make them reorient to their new location as the surrounding is different. That's the basics of moving the bees a short distance and having the orient to their new location. Or you can move the whole hive a few miles away for a few days and then put them where you want them.
OK, thanks so what is a short distance? And when would it be necessary to reset
 

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I did not think about resetting the bees either.... If you catch in your yard do you still have to do?if not will the whole hive leave including the queen?
 

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No, the whole hive will not leave the box, but your foragers are oriented to a certain location, and once you move the hive, they will return to the original spot of the hive and not to the new location. If moving the swarm trap over 2 miles, i wouldnt worry about screening them in for a few days or bother with a tree branch, as they will reorient due to the new surroundings. If moving less than 2 miles, I would put some brush or leafy branch in front of the hive to make them reorient.
 

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If moving less than 2 miles, I would put some brush or leafy branch in front of the hive to make them reorient.
Please explain what you mean by IN FRONT of the hive to make them reorient:}

I would think doing dat would really make them want to go back to there original area?

I bee confused...lol

Thanks in advance!
 

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In front meaning directly in front of the entrance, usually I will make them crawl thru a branch or grass to get I to the entrance. I want them to believe they are in a completely new place.
 

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Has anyone tried lemon balm as a substitute for lemon grass oil? I've found one piece buried in the archives that suggest one or two other lemon-scented plants may work, and "Virgil" (the poet?) mentioned a crushed balm.

I ask because lemon grass is an imported species, but my wife grows lemon balm, and bees like it.

I know we can just buy the oil, but the Master Gardener thinks she'd like to try her own herbs if they will work.
 

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The synthetic Nasonov pheromones (of which lemongrass oil is natural analog) are mixtures of citral, geraniol and nerol. These are closely related fairly short chains, and are abundant in the plant kingdom. Pine trees have non-trivial quantities. Research papers use a 1:1 ratio of citral:geraniol or 1:1:1 of the three oils.

Any of the "lemon" scented natural plants -- Thyme, Lemon Balm, Lemon Verbena, Rose Geranium (Citrosa or Pelargonium) have geraniol. Concentration in lemongrass oil is 12-15%, while Lemon Balm is 3-6%, and Lemon Verbena and the Pelagoniums are about 9%. The natural source of Citronella is a lemongrass genus (and the Citral-Citronella oils are co-extensive in culinary lemongrass ). Lemon zest (the skin of citrus) has substantial amounts of geraniol.

So yes, lemon balm is natural, temperate source of the attractant, at a lower yield than the tropical feedstock.

In my observation, the lemongrass oil gets scouts to investigate the swarm box. My working assumption is any strong recruitment scent (research shows cinnamon oil is especially good) would get scouts to the entrance. The decision for a swarm to settle on the box seems unrelated to the scout discovery following a scent trail. The use of lemongrass oil as a swarm attractant has an element of folklore -- it works, but so would cheap floral perfume, or clove oil, anything a scout bee will use to orient.

http://www.researchgate.net/profile...d_Honeybee_Swarms/file/79e415096fb63f0030.pdf
 
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