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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I put my new top feeder on my hive. I mucked about with it for a day and a bit and after a thorough test decided to give it the onion. All went well and the bees as usual could care less about me. As I was leaving I decided to just watch them as they flew in and out of the hive. To my horror I noticed a trickle, then a gushing of syrup coming from my trusty new feeder. I in my new bee haste had forgotten to make any kind of handles on my precision crafted accessory and as I fumbled to remove the piece of crap that was now spewing syrup, decided to flail about and fall over backwards with the defective top feeder freshly loaded with two gallons of syrup! I seriously fell over and dumped syrup all over me and the hive stand and the ground! Luckily I didn't dump it in the hive! I was just kinda lying there thinking that I must be the best beekeeper in the world, when I noticed that the bees could still care less that I was there. after I cleaned up my mess and dusted off my pride I watched the bees for a bit and they just seemed to know I was a jack ass and went about their buisness! I will re think my top feeder design (buy one) and tell you how I set my truck on fire with my smoker! Just thought I could be a source of inspiration for all you hard working beekeepers!:D
 

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Did you coat the inside with anything?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Buy a gallon paint can at HD and punch 2-3 small holes in the top. Feeder done. Cost $2.
Yeah good advice! Iam done with the whole box full o lose syrup! I put my mason jars back and Iam doing the bucket as we speak. Thanks !
 

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Thats funny! Be glad it wasnt a 10frm deep full of bees!!! You say you had 2 gals????? Might wanna give it to em in smaller increments. Not that your feeder couldnt handle that amnt but it may spoil before they eat it all. yeah.....my first feeder I made leaked too! lots of glue, 3 coats of varnish, caulking, bees wax and it STILL leaked!!! Look up FATBEEMAN NO LEAK FEEDER on youtube. Really good design if not wanting to go bucket/paint pail type.
 

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<snip>I will re think my top feeder design (buy one) and tell you how I set my truck on fire with my smoker! Just thought I could be a source of inspiration for all you hard working beekeepers!:D
Uh, you don't have a monopoly on doing brilliant things with smokers! But...we learn (sometimes at a cost, but we still learn!) :D Smoker Warning!!!

When I got my first bees I tried feeding with baggies...total failure. My mentor still feeds with them and does well with them. I think I got spooked off of them early on and probably if I revisited them they would work better now for me. I instead went with mason jars and have used them ever since then (four years now). They work well for me, though limited to a quart per jar I can add up to two quarts at a time the way I use them...and could expand that on up to a gallon or so with not too much trouble...simply cut more holes in the inner covers or feed directly on the top of the frames. So far, I've tried to leave enough honey on the hives if it's established colonies or either feed a few quarts to a swarm and let them take over from that.

Ross, I've read before of people using paint cans. I screen over my escape/feeder holes in my inner covers...do you think these would work as well as mason jars over the #8 screen? Are the lids recessed back past the rim of the cans? Are the paint cans durable for long-term use (I'm thinking about rust/corrosion at the punched holes)? Thanks.

Ed
 

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New paint cans are lined inside. I've never had one rust inside. They will rust outside, but they aren't outside enough to make it an issue. Mine last for years. If your screen is on the outside of the hole I think they can reach the can lid. If it is on the inside, they are at least the thickness of the top away from the can and won't be able to feed. I don't screen anymore. I cut a 2" hole in all of my migratory (flat plywood) tops. I invert the can over that hole. When I'm not feeding I put a scrap of wood over the hole and the bees glue it down.

I credit Michael Bush with teaching me the ways of the lazy beekeeper. Bees don't care if the boxes are fancy or plain, painted or bare, or if they have a few holes here and there. Whenever possible, have the bees do the work.
 

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Thanks for the feedback, Ross. My screening is on the topside of the inner cover. I've decided that I'm going to try "simple" in regards to my covers...probably splurge and use some Advantech for simple flat covers...maybe a rail or two attached to help reduce warping...with Advantech I don't know if that's a problem or not. Do you cover/shade the paint cans? How many and how big of a hole do you make in the lids?

Michael does indeed seem to have figured out how to polish many of the corners of beekeeping...he imparts much knowledge to the hobby and industry. We're blessed to have his feedback and input here. :thumbsup:

Thanks again, Ross.
Ed
 
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