Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It’s hard to tell if there is any robbing going on in my hives. They seem to be pretty active on the landing boards. Don’t notice any pollen comming in on the bees. Gonna give them a patty this afternoon. Don’t notice any fighting or different looking bees comming in our out.
What I have noticed is there is the odd bee comming out upside down on its back like its being thrown out of the hive. Rights itself then flys away.
They are fanning the hive on landing board to one side always. Never the full distance of the board.
Right now I have 1 full deep box of honey (9 frames) full of 80% capped honey. And the top full deep about 50% full of half capped honey.
Plan on extracting next Saturday ( waiting for my extractor to show up)
Nights are starting to cool down here so I thought I’d put the wooden entrance reducers back on to keep robbing chance down and help regulate the hive temps.
My question is does putting it on reduce their ability to dry the honey and cap it. Or will they adapt and figure it out.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6 Posts
I know a lot of starter hive kits come with a dual width entrance reducer a small entrance about 1 inch wide and a large entrance about 3-4 inches. The reducers are obviously useful for when you have a small or weak hive but once the hive grows big enough can you remove the reducer all together and allow the bees the full width of the entrance? Or is that inviting problems like yellow jackets and robbers?







snaptube vidmate word to pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
It depends. With a small entrance, honey might get too wet. With a large one, it will get robbed. Top entrances give better ventilation for their area. Entrance size is the most confusing part of beekeeping, and something I do not know how to do right.

Feeding patties on 8/8 might be bad. It could create too many bees and waste winter food.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,188 Posts
Bees are masters at what they do or they wouldn't have been doing it over most of the world for a million or so years. They have been drying honey for winter storage in cavities with their preferred about an inch in diameter hole that entire time. If your reduced entrance is that size, I doubt you are doing anything more than improving their HVAC scheme. Ambient humidity temperature and incoming nectar are all important variables in how much to reduce your colonies. In my high desert with low humidity and no nectar coming in, about two bees wide is all the total entrance the bees really need. They are busy propollizing the cracks and crevices now. Be cautious about breaking those too!
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top