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I have enrance reducers but they do not keep the mice out. Any recommendation for one item that reduces the size of the entrance and also keeps out mice?
 

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You must have some aggressive and small mice.
1/2" hardware cloth in front of the entrance ought to work.

1/8" cloth is too small and I don't think they make 3/8" cloth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Between the mice and raccoons, they rip out the old type wood reducers.
You must have some aggressive and small mice.
1/2" hardware cloth in front of the entrance ought to work.

1/8" cloth is too small and I don't think they make 3/8" cloth.
 

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Thick plastic plate, 1/4 -inch, slotted holes for adjusting up and down, two flat head screws and 6 two 8 7/32nds holes spaced out and drilled through. ( gotta check 7/32 inch diameter) Just big enough to drag a drone out the hole.

That is all I use-year round and when treating via OAV. I use a stick or tighten screws to insure it stays open in summer. I also use a screened bottom boards with sticky board in place - most of the time.
 

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Yes mice often fit through 1/2 " hardware cloth.
The trick is to cut or bend it so the openings are only 3/8 not a full square.
 

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Get some small nails and put them in the entrance reducer every 3/8ths of an inch or so. The bees can get through but the mice cannot.
 

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Get some small nails and put them in the entrance reducer every 3/8ths of an inch or so. The bees can get through but the mice cannot.
Here is a picture of it. The opening is about 3/8 to 1/2 high and the small nails are spaced on about 3/8" centers: a little closer if you are bothered by shrews.

The two deck screws can be gripped to pull the reducer out for cleaning. You may have to do it a few times till all the drones are turfed and occasionally during the winter so the entrance stays open to prevent smothering your bees if you have no upper vent or entrance.
 

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I use a strip of aluminum flashing the length of the reducer. I bent it 90 degrees and slip it under the bottom of the box. It's 3/4" or the depth of your excluder. Tin snips cut an opening the size of the opening, then bend it so it's 3'8" so the bees can get in but not the mice.
 

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Something like this would be easily adaptable to various hive entrances; this is what I did for my two Layens Hive entrances:
Layens#1-02.jpg

The upper plate holds the whole thing in place and the lower panel slides side-to-side to adjust the entrance size.
Fully slid over the entrance the 3/8" holes are my mouse guard.
Flip if over and the holes are too small for the bees, but will allow ventilation.

Funny bees. Currently the reducer is all the way open . . . they've still propolized it.
The second one is made a little differently and totally blocks the door when installed 'upside down'. They've also propalized it.

John
 

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Here is a picture of it. The opening is about 3/8 to 1/2 high and the small nails are spaced on about 3/8" centers: a little closer if you are bothered by shrews.

The two deck screws can be gripped to pull the reducer out for cleaning. You may have to do it a few times till all the drones are turfed and occasionally during the winter so the entrance stays open to prevent smothering your bees if you have no upper vent or entrance.
Funny. I did this exact same thing yesterday using linoleum nails and I thought I was inventing it.
 

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I can see what Michael Palmer does would be much more labor practical. The sharp fold in the screen would force a mouse to approach an opening at a very sharp angle which he just could not get his head around.;) Coming square on to half inch mesh would not even slow a mouse down.

I see some of this style in my winterizing. The palisade of small nails spaced in the entrance reducer is effective but fiddly if you have many colonies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Michael
I like this idea but how do you reduce the width of the entrance?
Cut a piece of 1/2” hardware cloth, 4”x the width of your bottom entrance. Fold lengthwise into a wedge and push it into entrance. Used this for many years...mice don’t go through it
 

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No. We have seperate entrance reducers and mouse guards. Maian Ellis of U of Nebraska designed one to do both jobs. Maybe Judy Wu-Smart still has the plans.

Crazy Roland
 

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And where racoons are pulling the screens out, combine Michael's bent screens with the nail idea to frustrate them and keep the mice out. :)
 

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Get some small nails and put them in the entrance reducer every 3/8ths of an inch or so. The bees can get through but the mice cannot.
This is what I do. Simple + works. I shoot brads through and then clip them to length.
 

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You can use your normal metal mouse excluder and use duct tape to reduce the entrance to whatever size you want.
 
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