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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend who had problems with some hives with ascospheriosis/chalkbrood asked me if there was any way to eliminate the spores of the frames with honey so that they could be placed in a healthy hive. In the research I did I did not find an answer to this particular situation. If anyone has a solution, I appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The spores aren't the root of the problem.
It is very possible that my shortcomings in English are making the communication difficult. My friend's doubt is if he can put the frames with honey that he has removed from a hive with chalkbrood in a healthy hive. If there is any way to eliminate the spores that may be contained in the frames of honey. Thank you Michael Palmer and Michael Bush for your attention.
 

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My friend's doubt is if he can put the frames with honey that he has removed from a hive with chalkbrood in a healthy hive. If there is any way to eliminate the spores that may be contained in the frames of honey.
No.

JMHO
 

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A friend who had problems with some hives with ascospheriosis/chalkbrood asked me if there was any way to eliminate the spores of the frames with honey so that they could be placed in a healthy hive.
Eduardo, have put combs containing chalk brood mummies into healthy colonies... and from my experience they clean them up and don't get chalk brood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Eduardo, have put combs containing chalk brood mummies into healthy colonies... and from my experience they clean them up and don't get chalk brood.
Thank you Pete.
I myself have had some cases of chalkbrood in the past and have never thought such handling would be advisable. At this moment I have a case identified in an apiary and I will do the experiment.
 

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I've definitely swapped frames with chalkbrood, or combined a chalkbrood hive to another. I've never noticed it in the new colony.

I've also always fixed the issue with requeening. Good genetics will take care of it before it becomes an issue. I have a hive right now that, although they are taking a lot of chalkbrood out of the hive, aren't managing it well enough to make me happy. It will get requeened as soon as my current splits w/queens mate and I can combine the nuc into the hive after pinching the queen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I've definitely swapped frames with chalkbrood, or combined a chalkbrood hive to another. I've never noticed it in the new colony.
Thank you mtnmyke.
I'll give this suggestion to my friend and he'll decide what to do. I had the idea that it would be best to eliminate the queen and do a shock swarm/shakedown and eliminate the frames with brood. I had the doubt as to what to do to frames that only have honey. Thankfully I put the question because your experience has shown me that there are those other alternatives to dealing with this problem.
 

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I had chalkbrood in a couple of hives for a year or two. It mysteriously went away. Looking back I can think of possibilities for why it disappeared. I began leaving my entrances more open through the winter. I think hive moisture could be a contributing factor. I also used apiguard for mite treatment the year it went away. I believe it has been established that thymol has an effect on chalkbrood. /beeinformed.org/2013/11/01/chalkbrood/
 
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