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Discussion Starter #1
Just read a thread that says to freeze cut comb honey to kill wax moth eggs. Can anything bad come from just eating cut comb from the frame? Also what do you do with frames that aren't fully capped?

As a first year beek I chew on comb that has nector or honey looking liquid in it when doing inspections. Some of it tastes good and some doesn't. You can tell when its good honey.
 

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You are fine eating the comb...the precaution of freezing cut comb comes from someone pulling their box of cut comb that they purchased from you out of the cab and it be a mess of maggots and web. I will extract if the frame is capped 80% or better.
 

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NasalSponge, I have deeps for brood with 6 5/8 honey supers. If some of the frames of honey are only 50% - 60% capped when I need to pull them for extraction what are my options with those frames. I have someone 20 miles away that will help me extract at his house, but I have to pull my supers same weekend he pulls his, limiting when I pull mine. Thanks for your thoughts.
 

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Can anything bad come from just eating cut comb from the frame?

Yes, you will get sick to your stomach if all you eat is honeycombs. Even John the Baptist mixed his honey with locusts to balance his diet. :)

Also what do you do with frames that aren't fully capped?

You can use the uncapped parts of the comb as chunk honey.
 

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I either freeze the frames or extract and bulk bottle (old 1-1/2g Clorox bottle) to feed back in the winter.
 

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I've eaten cut comb from my hives for five years, but the novelty wore off.

I now crush the comb with a cordless drill and chrome paint stirrer in a 5 gallon bucket, poor the mashed honey/wax into another bucket with with bottom holes and a nylon stainer. Overnight the honey drops through the holes, through a cut out lid and into a third bucket with a honey gate. I then let it sit for a few days or week to settle the bubbles, etc to the top and bottle through the gate. Michael Bush and Dennis Murrell provide good info for this. My food grade buckets came from the local Chinese restaurant. The $11 honey gate and $2 nylon strainer was the only expense.

I set the wax and all gear out for the girls to reclaim the residual honey. The buckets get rinsed, dried and set aside for next year and the rest goes through the dishwasher.

My 12 year old son and I just rendered the wax by heating in a galvanized bucket and straining through cotton cheese cloth, We then enjoyed the next couple hours making candles by dipping wicks. I use a $5 thrift store crock pot to make a vat of wax and put a pasta sauce jar in the crock to give us enough height for the candles. Wicks are tied to Popsicle sticks and hung on a scrap wood rack. We dip into the jar and ladle from the crock. When we had enough, the crock was unplugged, let cool and put away for a cold winter day with nothing better to do.

This way is just too easy for me to buy, work and clean a hand crank extracting rig for the few hives I desire to keep.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the info. I'm thinking it has been pretty easy so far with my two new hives this year. Setting up, Inspecting, working thru problems to get them going. But now I have honey to harvest as one hive has filled two supers. Looks like its going to take more equipment time and expense to get harvested. As a new beek this year seems best to sell honey in bulk if possible. And how in the world do you keep two hives from becoming four, and four becoming eight, etc. Love my bees tho.
 
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