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I'm in the process of making hive parts for next year. One piece that I am kind of confused by is the inner cover. Anyone have an easy method to make inner covers? Or more explicit directions on making a standard inner cover?

Thanks.
 

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A simple inner cover:

1 pc of 1/4 or 3/8 (even 1/2 or 3/4) cut to the same size (outside) as super.
Add 3/8 tk x 3/4 wide strips to form a "rim" around edges on 1 side.
In "front", cut out or leave an opening in rim for upper entrance/ventilation.

Some use a pc of plywood w/ no rim and a "V" notch for UE/vent.
 

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I pulled an old one apart a few years ago and built a bunch of new ones based on that. Basically, I used 1 X 2's for a frame and rabbeted a groove into the wood. I used 1/4" luan for the solid piece and I cut the oval circle with a jig saw before assembling everything. Glue and screws held it all together. For a notch, I just set the dado blade on the table saw to 3/8" and cut one side of the cover. They work just fine.
 

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I use the rips left over from cutting deeps out of 1x12s I dado a 1/4" slot for the plywood to fit in but I stand the 1x1 1/4 up so that there is a 3/16" space on one side and a 3/4" on the other and a pic is worth a thousand words.
 

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Forget the oval cut hole. The hole is a hold over from the old bee excluders that would fit in them. Get a hole saw drill bit just smaller than a canning jar lid. It makes it very easy to feed if needed.



 

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Or....if you're feeding with gallon size paint cans, make a couple. I don't have a pic but a few of my inner covers have multiple holes to accommodate more than one paint can!
 

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The word "easy" is relative. It depends on your motivation, experience, space and tools available. I prefer the ideas developed by Tim Arheit and have modified those covers to include some styrofoam insulation, combined with a simple extender I use them as feeders with jars, and for the winter I close most of the holes and turn them upside down. This gives me room for the "Mountain Camp" emergency ration, keeps possible condensation at a minimum etc. Take care and have fun
 

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get some paneling or luan and cut to same dimensions as hive body, get strips ( 1/4" thick x 3/4" wide and length to go around the boarder of paneling or luan ) brad nail strips to one side of luan/paneling and cut hand hole in the center if you want and your done.
 

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I visited a beeyard recently that had screened inner covers. Just a frame with screen stretched over it. Beek said it provides better ventilation and keeps moths from entering through the top. Keeps the bees in when you remove the top cover, too. I've not seen any mention on this forum of such a setup, though. Does anyone use them?
 

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Maybe it wouldn't be a bad idea to taper the sides of the inner cover outward to simulate a pitch on a roof line. From the center hole to the outer rims, I mean. Moisture would condensate, if any, and run towards the sides rather than drip on the bees and kill them in the winter. The pitch wouldn't be much, say 1/2" from side to center hole. See my Honey Bee page for the picture I'm trying to describe... JPEG uploads are not allowed for some reason....
 
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