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I know this is a rather basic question but would like to ask if, when people make an early split, do they always feed them? The earliest trees are in bloom but I know they are not getting a heavy flow of nectar. And they are still drinking from the cats water dish, though the numbers have diminished.
 

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No, I do not always feed. When I do a split, I try to make sure that every hive gets its fair share of the stores. If they have plenty, there is no need to feed. Often one of the splits will get all the foragers because all my splits stay in the same yard. In that case, I try to let the hive with the lack of foragers have some extra.
 

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For me it depends. I always feed my nuc splits, but a flyback split no. I do like dudelt and divide the stores. The nucs will lose their foragers and I need to make sure there is ample for them to go two to three weeks of comb building and raising the rest of the open brood that was on the frames I made them with. By that time, enough of the bees will have graduated to forager status and feeding when the flow is on is no longer necessary.
 

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depends on the time line, goals, flow, and input resources.
Its a spitball (based on Randy Oliver 2016) 40 pounds of sugar to provide the calories draw the wax for 2 deeps and a medium super from foundation.
do you want the split to make a crop? or just over winter as a nuc? or a single, or double? how much drawn comb are you adding,how strong or weak is the split... etc

sugar is $0.50(or so) a pound, Seeley 2001 suggests a 2:1 feed conversion... A $40 Queen and 3# of bees costs how much?
run the math... for many adding some feed gives a strong RIO
If your a big guy, ya you got to watch the bottom line... $10 bucks hive over feeding with a 2,000 hives is an impact!!! $20,000 :eek:
But a BYBK? not so much
short form. You want more bees, feed
long form. If you need to ask random people on a forum, you likely not big enough to worry about it (yet).
 

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i like to feed a little before i introduce a cell or mated queen. i wouldn't if it was too cool or if robbing was a concern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't have a lot of hives but I like to do the best by them. They do have several partial frames of honey available but not much pollen. I can add a frame with about half pollen to the nuc. I usually feed inside the hive- that is, in an empty super over the brood box and on the inner cover. I have problems with raccoons mostly, so keep the bottle of sugar water inside.
They will have to raise their own queen at this point. Will check on the progress this afternoon.

Thanks for your thoughts and ideas.
 

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If you have honey to give them, I would do that. If you don't, then I would feed them. I like to let them run out between feedings so the queen can lay up some space that might get clogged with syrup if I feed constantly. They can't build up without resources, but bees are good at allocating resources when they have them. They are not good at allocating space for the queen to lay when there is an unlimited amount of syrup coming in. I think the bees tend to see this as a spill and they want to put it somewhere. So if there is no flow, I would feed and a few days after that feed runs out, I would feed again. But if there is a flow, I would leave them alone.

"The reader will by now have drawn the conclusion that stimulative feeding, apart from getting the foundations drawn out in the brood chamber, plays no part in our scheme of bee-keeping. This is in fact so." --Beekeeping at Buckfast Abbey, Brother Adam

"Very many, at the present time, seem to think that brood rearing can be made to forge ahead much faster by feeding the bees a teacupful of thin sweet every day than by any other method; but from many experiments along this line during the past thirty years I can only think this a mistaken idea, based on theory rather than on a practical solution of the matter by taking a certain number of colonies in the same apiary, feeding half of them while the other half are left "rich" in stores, as above, but without feeding and then comparing "notes" regarding each half, thus determining which is the better to go into the honey harvest...results show that the "millions of honey at our house" plan followed by what is to come hereafter, will outstrip any of the heretofore known stimulating plans by far in the race for bees in time for the harvest." --A Year's work in an Out Apiary, G.M. Doolittle.

"Probably the single most important step in management for achieving colony strength, and one most neglected by beekeepers, is to make sure the hives are heavy with stores in the fall, so that they emerge from overwintering already strong early in the spring" --The How-To-Do-It book of Beekeeping, Richard Taylor

"The feeding of bees for stimulating brood-rearing in early spring is now looked upon by many as of doubtful value. Especially is this true in the Northern States, where weeks of warm weather are often followed by 'Freeze up.' The average beekeeper in the average locality will find it more satisfactory to feed liberally in the fall-- enough, at least so that there shall be sufficient stores until harvest. If the hives are well protected, and the bees well supplied with an abundance of sealed stores, natural brood rearing will proceed with sufficient rapidity, early in the spring without any artificial stimulus. The only time that spring feeding is advisable is where there is a dearth of nectar after the early spring flow and before the coming of the main harvest." --W.Z. Hutchinson, Advanced Bee Culture

"While it is often advocated that stimulative feeding be resorted to early, in order to build the colonies up to a sufficient strength, the author inclines to the belief that colonies in two stories will build up just as rapidly if there is an abundance of sealed honey in the hive, as is possible with stimulative feeding. Sometimes it seems that uncapping a portion of the honey has a stimulating effect, but feeding in small quantities, for the purpose of stimulating the bees to greater activity, rarely seems necessary..."--Frank Pellett, Practical Queen Rearing

 

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I know this is a rather basic question but would like to ask if, when people make an early split, do they always feed them? The earliest trees are in bloom but I know they are not getting a heavy flow of nectar. And they are still drinking from the cats water dish, though the numbers have diminished.
I almost never feed splits, most if not all the time I split the stores, so each part has a frame or 2 of honey.
I guess if your preferred keeping place has spotty flow or lots of dearth's then it would make sense to feed those splits, but to what end,, there is spotty flow and lots of dearth's, so you then have more hives to feed.

I split fairly strong hives, my fairly strong hives have lots of stores, your "locale" may differ.

GG
 

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I always feed early splits. Even if there is a light flow. I feed the split and the hive that I split. I expect them to make honey so I push them to get a single drawn out so they can get their first super.
 
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