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1622 Virginia.

1853 California.

It wasn't easy to get them here. Keeping bees alive for 8 weeks on the ocean is difficult.
 

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A year after the Mayflower arrived—perhaps with bees aboard—the Virginia Company of London sent beehives to its governor at Jamestown, "the preservation and encrease whereof we recommend to you." And "encrease" they did. By 1705, Virginia planter Robert Beverley could write: "Bees thrive there abundantly, and will very easily yield to the careful Huswife, two Crops of Honey in a Year." By 1782, as Thomas Jefferson wrote, "The bees have generally extended themselves into the country, a little in advance of the white settlers. The Indians therefore call them the white man's fly." When bees came, could settlers be far behind?
https://www.history.org/Foundation/journal/Autumn07/bugs.cfm
 

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1622?


"So when did the first colonies of honey bees arrive in the New World? These bees probably came from England and arrived in Virginia in 1622. By 1639 colonies of honey bees were found throughout the woods in Massachusetts. Some of the colonists who arrived at Plymouth likely brought bees, as well as sheep, cows and chickens on the trip across the Atlantic.";

https://www.agriculture.purdue.edu/agcomm/newscolumns/archives/OSL/1999/November/111199OSL.html

"The only evidence we have of the initial importation of honey bees to North America is a letter written December 5, 1621 by the Council of the Virginia Company in London and addressed to the Governor and Council in Virginia, “Wee haue by this Shipp and the Discouerie sent you diurs [divers] sortes of seedes, and fruit trees, as also Pidgeons, Connies, Peacockes Maistiues [Mastiffs], and Beehives, as you shall by the invoice pceiue [perceive]; the preservation & encrease whereof we respond vnto you…” (Goodwin 1956; Kingsbury 1906:532). The Discovery (60 tons, Thomas Jones, captain, and twenty persons) left England November 1621 and arrived in Virginia March 1622 (Langford Ship Information; Brown 1898:469-470). The other ship described only as “this shipp” could have been either the Bona Nova (200 tons, John Huddleston, master, and fifty persons) or the Hopewell (60 tons, Thomas Smith, master, and twenty persons), also known as the Great Hopewell. The Bona Nova was a month behind and arrived at Jamestown in April (Langford Ship Information). This was the Hopewell’s first voyage to Virginia and there is no record of the date of its arrival (Langford Ship Information), although Brown claims it arrived at Jamestown within 24 days of the Good Friday March 22, 1622 massacre (Brown 1898:469).";

http://www.orsba.org/download/Honey Bees Across America.html
 

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Can anyone imagine Vikings coming here, finding no bees and not bringing any back on the next trip? Vikings without mead are no Vikings at all...
I agree, but unfortunately ........... no proof...... I guess the Vikings were too drunk to write about it! :lookout:
 

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> I guess the Vikings were too drunk to write about it!

The Vikings did not keep records. The Spanish didn't keep very good records... Judging by the genetics of chickens in California and South America, the Chinese brought a lot of things with them in 1421. Although they kept good records, most were destroyed when they went into their xenophobia phase...

As far as the earliest documentation I think it's a letter dated December 5, 1621 addressed to the Governor and Council in Virginia from the Council of the Virginia Company in London: "Wee haue by this Shipp and the Discouerie sent you diurs [divers] sortes of seedes, and fruit trees, as also Pidgeons, Connies, Peacockes Maistiues [Mastiffs], and Beehives, as you shall by the invoice pceiue [perceive]; the preservation & encrease whereof we respond vnto you…” (Goodwin 1956; Kingsbury 1906:532)."
 

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The Indians named them " white man's flies" might be an indication there were none here before.

"Prior to the arrival of the Old World settlers, honey bees were unknown to Native Americans. In fact, several early American writers, including Thomas Jefferson, reported that honey bees were called “white man's flies.” The name was recognition that the appearance of honey bees in America was associated with the arrival of the Europeans.

There was a close association between the westward migration of Europeans and the establishment of wild colonies of honey bees. Native Americans were said to have noticed that shortly after colonies of honey bees were discovered, white settlers would not be far behind."

Same source as above.
 

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The question is bad. Deduct 20 points from the house of slitherin.

Bees? Which species?
U.S. did not exist until the late-1700's.

So who knows when apis melifera was brought to north america? ;)
 

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Anyone want to take a crack at this?
Larry,
Please allow me to “piggy-back” on your thread as I love to read the history and knowledge shared on this forum. What information do we have as to when and where bees were first domesticated? I do not think we can consider Samson a beekeeper (Judges 14:8&9) after killing a lion, even though he got some honey out of the deal.
Thanks.
 
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