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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, here on this super frame with nectar and a little pollen, is a part of an emergency queen cell? If you look at the bottom pic there's actually like 3. Should II be concerned and look into the brood nest to see if they killed the queen and they're just making E cells willy nilly?
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I think they're play cups, but why are they so far up? Oh, and I messed up, I mean superseder cells not emergency cells.
 

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Bees do not understand queen excluders. If those cell cups are empty they have been built so if the time comes to swarm, the queen can lay eggs in them.

There are pretty much always some empty queen cell cups in a typical hive, what matters is what is inside them. But yes, take a look in the brood nest, it is always a good idea if you have the hive open to pull at least one brood frame to check all is going as it should.
 

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Totally normal to have a number of cups in a hive so long as there isn't an egg/larvae then it's not a concern.

Swarm cells are not always at the bottom, but usually at the bottom half of the frame.

Just keep in mind, too many disturbances on a hive can cause superscedure. Your daily inspections may be a little excessive :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
mtnmyke, ya I'm going to limit it to every couple days (not full inspections). Oh, just so I don't have to make a whole new thread, when I make a split, I'm planning on taking three frames of brood, two frames of food, and shake in a frame a bees. Do I put the the two frames of food on the edges of the brood frames or put them all the way on the ends of the hive? Thanks.
 

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Ok, I thought swarm cells were always farther down on frames.
Not always. This is a popular myth that fools many.

Unfortunately some people make the wrong choices about their hive, because they judge wether a hive is preparing to swarm, or superseding, based on where on the comb the queen cells are.

Swarm cells can be anywhere on a comb, and supersedure cells can be anywhere on a comb.

You'll even see the occasional post where somebody says their bees are confused, cos they are building supersedure cells, and swarm cells, at the same time. Or a person will say their bees built supersedure cells, but then they swarmed. The bees are not confused they know what they are doing, the confusion is the beekeeper, who thinks that cells in one place are for supersedure, and in another place, are for swarming.

To the bees, a queen cell is a queen cell, for whatever purpose they built it, regardless of where on the comb it is.
 

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Oh, you are openeing the hive every 2 days? In that case, please do not follow my former advise to check the brood nest every time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was kinda doin it like... every day... I'm a bee addict basically lol. I am stopping getting in there every day though. I plan to check the super maybe every 2-3 days but only get in the brood nest once a week.
 

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You need 14 hives so you can check one every day and not kill them lol

For your split with your new queen keep the brood together with food on the outsides. You're already disturbing them so reorganizing doesn't hurt and will only help by keeping the nest together and warm.
 
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