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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have finally go through testing all of my colonies and found this one near the end. ~60 mites in a 300 bee alcohol wash and DWV. Here are a couple of pics. I treated with MAQS and will also requeen assuming the colony looks like it can recover post treatment. This is a good example of quickly things can go badly. This colony filled and capped two full supers and third super of comb honey in July. Two weeks later its crashing badly.

Bee Pattern Insect Honeycomb Beehive Green Hand Jade
 

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Zhiv9 if that pic is typical of the rest of the colony it is too far gone for Maqs to have much chance of fixing it.

What could work is treating it with Apivar plus giving it a comb of healthy brood from another colony.

Over to you of course though, and, miracles do happen, it just may survive if you do nothing further.

The best producing hives with the biggest populations are sometimes the ones that crash in fall, as all those mites that were in it get jammed onto a smaller population of bees.
 

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I figured I would reassess in a week at the end of treatment. A frame of healthy brood couldn't hurt regardless and is good advice. Assuming they still have a decent population, I will likely do that, requeen and feed. They'll have some catching up to do and not a lot of time left to do it in.
 

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The best producing hives with the biggest populations are sometimes the ones that crash in fall, as all those mites that were in it get jammed onto a smaller population of bees.
Very true statement here and well said. I've made the mistake before of thinking that my booming fall colonies will be great candidates for booming spring colonies giving me splits and honey. Instead, they crash hard when it's all but too late to do much about it.
 
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