Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
warm day here in Western NC.

went into double deep nuc. plenty of honey in upper deep with good ladder to get to it. bees were not in top save for 3 or 4. pulled frames and they looked dusky, kind of grayed out. no signs of moisture (no running water signs). i have a top feeder with sugar feeder with lid and 2 other burlap covered vent holes. i have a piece of bubble/silver insulation beneathe the top feeder with holes for the three vents and end holes in the feeder to vent. ive reduced the entrance to an inch.

i had activity today in and out of hive. just concerned color of frames is mold.

did not break seal between boxes so didnt really hunt for bees in lower box. maybe i should have.

i wrapped the hive...winter is coming here next week or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,076 Posts
Not from your area but looked at your weather and would advise that you remove the feederi if you are feeding sugar water. Sugar water does introduce a lot of moisture and they are not able to dry it with your temps. They will not take it unless the temp of the sugar water is at least 50. If you are feeding dry sugar, post a pic. Hard for me to picture how you are set up. J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
Yep, what Fivej said. I get mildew on my tops when I'm feeding and moisture is hard to remove. We do have some bad wx moving in over the weekend. I would feed dry sugar bit you need to mist it a little to make a crust or the housekeepers will throw it out as trash. Just hold on... spring is just around the corner and you can put your syrup back in. I can hardly wait because I think I have a failing queen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
LL

Why are you feeding if there is plenty of honey in the top box? Yes its hard to picture your setup but it sounds as if you could be trapping moisture. The dusky look to your frames could be what's commonly referred to as wax bloom. Your in N.C. not North Dakota. Make sure your bees have lots of ventilation and check them down the road. Sounds like they are ok for now. I'd definitely remove the bubble insulation.
 

·
Premium Member
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
As beekeepers that want to help one another, we often give advice based on personal experience without knowing all of the factors involved. One thing I have noticed is that folks fail to understand how beneficial screened bottom boards are in winter for reducing moisture buildup. I have 16 hives, 7 10-frame and 9 nucs. All have feeders on them and I just switched to 1:1 syrup along with sugar bricks and broodbuilder pollen sub patties. My tops are all telescoping with inner covers. Some have an upper entrance but most do not. The nucs have mason jar feeders with a medium 5-frame super on top. The 10-framers have a styrofoam hive top feeder. This is my setup and I have had absolutely zero moisture problems this winter or last. No wet wood, no mold, no piles of soggy dead bees. So, a lot depends on your particular configuration.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top