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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I decided to try a new (at least to me) way of feeding dry sugar.









We will see how it works out, but I think it should be good.
 

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I tried some heavy brown paper as a wrap for sugar bricks and the bees had a hard time getting thru it. It is so easy to make no heat sugar bricks that I doubt I need any new innovations on this line. However when I put supplemental feed on when I wrap my bees for the winter it will always be mountain camp in the future. I like the bricks after the bees are more mobile yet before liquid feeding is possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Currently feeding this? Why not just liquid feed?
Because it is raining and the highs barely break 50F, we have about 2-3 weeks to the first good flow and they are eating it.

What are your experiences with simply pouring sugar in a frame feeder?
I have never tried that.

I tried some heavy brown paper as a wrap for sugar bricks and the bees had a hard time getting thru it. It is so easy to make no heat sugar bricks that I doubt I need any new innovations on this line. However when I put supplemental feed on when I wrap my bees for the winter it will always be mountain camp in the future. I like the bricks after the bees are more mobile yet before liquid feeding is possible.
That is why I used light weight paper lunch bags. Easily fits 2.5-5 lb sugar. I usually do use the mountain camp method, however I wanted to try this and it was quick and easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well here are the results.

 

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My bees ate very little of the dry sugar; perhaps a pound, and are now carrying it out and dumping it. I notice some falls down and gets into cells. Perhaps that is what is putting them off, as they are just nicely getting into brooding. There is lots of honey left so they are thumbing their nose at the sugar.

Perhaps it makes a difference in your local climate and humidity and how you ventilate your hives, whether you should moisten it or put it up dry. Maybe there is no "one right way" to do sugar feeding.
 

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My bees ate very little of the dry sugar; perhaps a pound, and are now carrying it out and dumping it. I notice some falls down and gets into cells. Perhaps that is what is putting them off, as they are just nicely getting into brooding. There is lots of honey left so they are thumbing their nose at the sugar.
I find that they will take fondant at any time of year. Even with lots of honey in the hive.
 

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It is just as easy to mix water into dry sugar until it gets slightly slushy. Spread out on waxed paper or plastic wrap overnight -- you can mold it if you want into "bricks". It will harden up enough to move it as one chunk, which you can then put on the hive as needed. If you make them thin, they will fit under an inverted cover, or use a box.

It's also quite easy to put a sheet of newspaper on top of the frames and pour dry sugar on top. You can use an empty super for the space. Easier than messing around with bags and water, but much of the sugar will simply pour through the hive when the bees rip the paper out unless you dampen it, in which case you could have made the bricks instead just as easily!

Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It is just as easy to mix water into dry sugar until it gets slightly slushy. Spread out on waxed paper or plastic wrap overnight -- you can mold it if you want into "bricks". It will harden up enough to move it as one chunk, which you can then put on the hive as needed. If you make them thin, they will fit under an inverted cover, or use a box.

It's also quite easy to put a sheet of newspaper on top of the frames and pour dry sugar on top. You can use an empty super for the space. Easier than messing around with bags and water, but much of the sugar will simply pour through the hive when the bees rip the paper out unless you dampen it, in which case you could have made the bricks instead just as easily!

Peter
All true. Sugar bricks and mountain camp feeding are easy approches. So is this, in fact I thought it was easier (granted not by a huge margin), and it seemed to work well. If I have to pop the top in poor weather I will use it again.
 
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