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When a queen looks into a cell prior to inserting her abdomen, there are many explanations that I won't go into: however, I believe it is a momentary check, like, "the coast is clear". I believe that when laying in the enlarged cells, compression on her abdomen is less than when laying in worker size cells. I believe that lesser push at that egg deposit prevents semen from exiting her seminal duct. As a result a drone egg is deposited. You will notice, for example, when using a honey frame rather than a deep,
bees fashion drone size cells. This seems to be for expedience in filling out that available space in a deep super. You will notice pollen going in and occasionally honey and at times in such cells, you may find drone larvae. I rest my case. Thanks for the opportunity to spout.
 

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2 (10 frame) langstroth hives (first year)
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What do you think would happen if the queen only had drone sized cells to lay in?
 

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I wonder if you could test this. Maybe something like putting a queen in a box of drone only cells, but somehow squeezing her all the time (straw around her?) to the size of a worker cell and see what she does?
 

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the queen measures the cell with her front legs
Niko Koeniger ran an experiment to demonstrate this.. taped up the legs so the cells "felt" smaller and the queeen layed worker brood in drone cells
 

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the queen measures the cell with her front legs
Niko Koeniger ran an experiment to demonstrate this.. taped up the legs so the cells "felt" smaller and the queeen layed worker brood in drone cells
Ok! now how about the decision making that puts a fertilized egg in queen cups?
 

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I wouldn't be suprized if it was a measurement thing as well
that aside we know they lay bigger eggs in queen cells DEFINE_ME
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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When a queen looks into a cell prior to inserting her abdomen, there are many explanations that I won't go into: however, I believe it is a momentary check, like, "the coast is clear". I believe that when laying in the enlarged cells, compression on her abdomen is less than when laying in worker size cells. I believe that lesser push at that egg deposit prevents semen from exiting her seminal duct. As a result a drone egg is deposited. You will notice, for example, when using a honey frame rather than a deep,
bees fashion drone size cells. This seems to be for expedience in filling out that available space in a deep super. You will notice pollen going in and occasionally honey and at times in such cells, you may find drone larvae. I rest my case. Thanks for the opportunity to spout.
Hi George Welcome to BeeSource
So you must be 78 -80 if you have had bees for 70 Years.
Hopefully you are still keeping with your bees.

I rarely see pollen in drone cells, not sure could be a locale thing.
Do you use plastic foundation for your brood area?

GG
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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gowning up in the slide rule days

5 per inch for worker and 4 per inch for drone.
Was close enough for identification.

maybe if my ole slide ruler was Metric.........

GG
 

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Ok! now how about the decision making that puts a fertilized egg in queen cups?
In a natural situation for swarming, the base and openings of the queen cells are worker-sized, not drone-sized. For supercedure, the cells laid are in worker-sized cells. The workers then determine the provenance of the larvae.
 
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