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After pinching a drone-laying queen what would you do? No mated queens are available yet.

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Hello - I have a drone laying queen. I suspect she was superceded or swarmed late last autumn without me knowing about it. This spring I have witnessed only drone brood being layed. It's now May 2. Today I located the queen and pinched her. My options now are 1) bring a frame of eggs over from my second strong hive or 2) consolidate the bees and put them ontop of my first hive. I am not quite sure what the best option is. I have no shortage of bees but mated queens will not be available in my area until Mid June. I am a bit worried about causing overcrowding in my queen-rite hive. There are now quite a few drones in the first hive.
 

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if you think you have enough bees in both hives moving over a frame may work. It would alteast buy you some time to keep the hive from going laying worker.

The big risk with a drone heavy hive is if there are not many workers they may not care for the frame and/or draw out a queen cell(s). The drone's also do not forge for food so this hive may go thru more stores since there is nothing comming in (weather dependent)
 

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You give 2 options, but either could be right, or wrong, depending on other factors.

If there are plenty of drones flying or close to it in your area you could give them some eggs to allow production of a new virgin. But if not many drones then that likely won't work out so combine, because keeping them waiting 6 weeks until mated queens are available will almost certainly end badly.

The worker cell raised drones in your hive can not be relied on as a source of drones for a new queen to mate with.
 

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The worker cell raised drones in your hive can not be relied on as a source of drones for a new queen to mate with.
Yup!

I would combine them with another strong colony with a few layers of newspaper. This will give that colony a good boost in numbers and allow the queen in there to peak much sooner than she normally would. As such, you could then later split them out into a walk-away split, or will keep them at peak strength until queen become available.

You could give them eggs and hope they raise a new queen but it sounds fairly early in your area to be doing so.

I also tend to error on the side of strengthening the strong and culling the weak vs. using the strong to strengthen the weak.
 

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I'm not familiar with your area so as Oldtimer said, it depends on if you have a lot of flying drones this time of year. (I wouldn't determine that based on the drones in the drone laying queen hive). Do you already have mature drones in your other hive? If so, give it a shot. If not, then I'd combine them.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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the answer is it depends...

how many bees in the hive,, they will need to nurse the frame of eggs/larvae
cluster size the size of the brood on the frame would optimally match or be slightly smaller so all the brood can be covered.
Is there drones available when the queen hatches, else she then cannot mate any way.
availability of fresh pollen, normally they do not make queens from last years pollen.

as your icon has the Canadian flag you are likely better off combining and then keep an eye out for queen cells when the dandelions bloom and then split then. perhaps even into 3 or 4 if there are enough cells.

GG
 
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