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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen FBM (Fat bee man) and many others refer to drone comb when looking at uncapped frames.

Do bees draw comb to be for drones? I know when there is drone brood, the bulbus cappings. But when looking at the drawn unused comb is there a difference between comb drawn for workers and comb drawn for drones?
 

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Drone cells are larger on average than worker cells. Yes bees will draw comb especially for drones.

You might find drone cells on the outside edges of your frames. Wnen capped they are as you mentioned capped differently. Capped drone cells have larger domed caps than worker cells, and are usually larger in diameter than worker cells.

Some people feel it is important to give the bees space to make drone comb at will. Some of these beekeepers will cut holes in plastic foundations with a hole saw or remove a section at one end or the other or in the center to give the bees some space to make different sized comb. Other people will give bees some partial frames of foundation in a couple of frames in the brood box. Many wax foundations have some space at each end of the frame and bees will put drone cells there. Of course others simply cut some wax foundation away.

There are beekeepers who let the bees draw all of their combs foundationless. In this way the bees make whatever size cells they deem fit. Many feel that the bees will draw up their own combs faster without foundation than with. Others feel that providing the wax foundation gives them a head start in that they can remold the wax in the foundation instead of drawing all of the wax from scratch.

There is also special foundation meant to encourage the creation of more drones wherein the foundation has larger cells imprinted into it. Some use such frames in the management of Varroa mites as they prefer to grow in drone cells. These beekeepers will remove the infested drone frames to reduce the varroa population. Basically the drones are being used as mite lures and then are destroyed before emerging from the cocoon state.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
interesting. I use wax wired foundation and at times struggle with messy drone comb being built on the lower edges of the frames. These lumps of drone come are a mess.

For tidiness sakes I might cut away small areas at the bottom of some frames to discourage drone/bridge comb. Overall a tidier hive.

Worth a shot maybe.
 
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