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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone noticed that comb drawn in a semicircular hive body is more compact and less likely to slough off compared to those drawn in a trapezoidal body. There is simply more surface area on the bar relative to the depth of the comb. I've also noticed that the semicircular comb has a more uniform thickness and less likely to thin at the bottom of the hive body. I have semicircular top bar hives and trapezoidal, and in this crazy Texas heat I'm considering switching to all semicircular. I also get less brace comb with hives having the semicircular bodies.

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Has anyone noticed that comb drawn in a semicircular hive body is more compact and less likely to slough off compared to those drawn in a trapezoidal body. There is simply more surface area on the bar relative to the depth of the comb. I've also noticed that the semicircular comb has a more uniform thickness and less likely to thin at the bottom of the hive body. I have semicircular top bar hives and trapezoidal, and in this crazy Texas heat I'm considering switching to all semicircular. I also get less brace comb with hives having the semicircular bodies.

Thanks
That is the Catenary Arc! seen everywhere in nature for a good reason.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, I've noticed that as the new comb grows it maintains the catenary arc form then it starts to conforms to the semicircular shape of the hive. It's pretty cool to see this arc when you pull a bar out with festooning bees.
 
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