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Does anyone have experience with doubling up on the packages installed in a hive in the spring? I was thinking that I would put two packages of bees in a single hive (with a single queen) to give them an even bigger jump start.

What feedback can anyone offer on the efficacy of this idea?
 

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Does anyone have experience with doubling up on the packages installed in a hive in the spring? I was thinking that I would put two packages of bees in a single hive (with a single queen) to give them an even bigger jump start.

What feedback can anyone offer on the efficacy of this idea?
Or you could start them bost and if one is crappy, combine them

Or you could start them both and combine right before the main flow and pinch the poorest queen to capitilize on your bees to brood being reared and get a major honey crop.

If I was to do what you are thinking of, I would make sure one queen was not a poor queen first.

Just me thoughts.
 

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i seen it done last spring. 6lb of bees in one hive is a lot of bees. dont know the outcome as i have lost touch with that beekeeper but yes i have seen it done.
 

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But you could start two and they both would probably do fine. The failure of packages to thrive is, in my opinion, the quality of the queens. If both queens are good they will both do great. If one is not good, the bees will move next door on their own without your help...

Some people buy extra queens and split the packages in half and still do fine... but there is a reason that that size has evolved as a standard size of a package. It's enough bees to get a colony started well enough.
 

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What size package, what time of year, and what is your goal? Studies have show that a 2 lb package will catch up to a 3 lb package by the time the second round of brood starts hatching. If you start them to big you have a lull with many more bees perishing( ones that come with the package) causing more broodnest backfillng leading to earlier swarming to a inexperience beekeeper. This is just my opinion.
 

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Studies have show that a 2 lb package will catch up to a 3 lb package by the time the second round of brood starts hatching.
I agree, and to bolster this I noticed this year that my "smaller" swarms outperformed ALL of the large ones I caught.
 

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I put 2 - 3# packages in one hive to try to make comb honey (notice I said try) it didnt impress me at all I did use the extra queen to do a split.

I have talked to people that have had good luck with this but every time I try some thing some else has had good luck with it dont work for me :doh:
 
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