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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently got an itch for a long hive and after quite a bit of research, I dove in head first. But first, let me provide a little background. I've been keeping bees since 2012 just as a hobby. I'm not trying to sell honey nor bees, just simply for enjoyment and personal knowledge. I have several Langstroth hives located in two different yards. One yard is in my backyard and the other is a few miles away at my Dad's farm. I've had successes and failures over the years. Most of my failures were early on and most were of my own making. The worst one was in the summer of 2014. I had a hive here at the house that exploded with bees and honey. It had 3 deep brood boxes and 7 or 8 medium supers. My son was playing on a travel lacrosse team that summer and between working, taking him to Atlanta everyday for practice and then traveling all over the SE on the weekends to tournaments, I just kept adding supers because I didn't have time to do anything else. Well, most of you can imagine what happened, yep, SHB. They destroyed the entire hive. I was sick and it almost made me quit the hobby. But, I vowed to carry on and learn from my mistake. Since then, I've kept the hives under control, pulled supers when needed and more or less let the bees do their thing. So far no treatments, not because I am against it, but it hasn't been needed, yet ( I just jinked myself, probably).

A couple months ago I stumbled across one of Dr. Leo's videos on u-tube and became quite intrigued with the long hive concept, something new and challenging. My research ensued and brought me back to here (Beesource) where I discovered quite a bit of information, especially from GregV and Little John. As a side note, I wish I understood the Russian language because I've learned quite a bit watching all the videos GregV has provided while muted. I can only imagine what I might learn if I could actually understand what the hell they were saying :D Anyway, I decided to build two horizontal hives, a modified Layens and a double deep Langstroth. This thread is about the Langstroth, I'll start another one for the Layens.

I like to start projects off with my givens and druthers:

Givens
  • Langstroth Compatibility
  • Double deep
  • Able to use existing extractor
  • Multiple hive capability

Druthers
  • Use Langstroth deep frame dimensions
  • Allow stacking of supers
  • Gable roof
  • Multiple entrances
  • Controlled airflow
  • Control SHB

Woodworking and 3D design are a couple other hobbies I enjoy, so I put those to work and came up with this:


DDL3D1.jpg

That design turned into this:

Langstroth2.jpg Langstroth1.jpg Langstroth5.jpg

Here is the double deep frame. The top is a standard deep Lang and the bottom is a deep Lang with a modified top bar. The two are zip tied together. The inspiration for this frame and the zip ties came from GregV. Thanks, Greg.

Langstroth4.jpg

I installed bees this past Sunday, a swarm I caught during a rain storm. I'll keep a log here of how this hive does over the summer and winter. All comments and questions and constructive criticism welcomed.
 

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Hey Dan,
Great work!

You should definitely watch this Ukrainian guy - his entire channel pretty much (too bad, no subs; but you will see lots of useful things).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJVnMEsRZrs - single row double-deep (full Dadant + shallow Dadant)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCFJ_CVPxqc - 16-frame double-deep and extra super
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hcE4urJWSs - another double-deep
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKLg5C1Z4FU&t=34s - another double-deep

PS: full Dadant + shallow Dadant ~ double deep Lang
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey Dan,
You should definitely watch this Ukrainian guy - his entire channel pretty much (too bad, no subs; but you will see lots of useful things).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJVnMEsRZrs

Thanks, Greg. I'll certainly give it a go but I have to wait till the wife is not around. She has started giving me really strange looks when she walks in my office and sees me watching these Russian/Ukrainian videos :D
 

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Thanks, Greg. I'll certainly give it a go but I have to wait till the wife is not around. She has started giving me really strange looks when she walks in my office and sees me watching these Russian/Ukrainian videos :D
LOL!
Blew your cover - those are secret codes broadcasted under the guise of beekeeping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A little more information about this hive. It is made of 3/4" plywood with all cut edges sealed with Titebond III before assembly. It is 49" long, 20" wide and 21.5" deep. It has a screened bottom but sits on a 2.5" frame with a solid bottom board. The solid bottom board has an access door on the back so I can add pans of vegetable oil for SHB's. The hive will hold 32 double deep Langstroth frames, which is equivalent to 64 deep Langs. I can divide the hive into 3 separate colonies should I choose. There are 3 entrances on the front that can be closed/reduced independently and there are 3 entrances/vents on each end of the hive. The end openings have rotary dials that allow for 4 settings: open, closed, vent, and QE. Not sure I need all these openings, but they're there if the need arises. The entrances and end rotary dials were all 3D printed. The frames are covered with narrow inner cover boards that can be removed 2 or 3 at time for inspections. Some of the inner covers are also vented but the vents can be closed as needed. I took great care during construction to make sure the only place SHB's could enter the hive is through the front door. I purchased the "Guardian" SHB entrance to help further deter SHB's but I prefer to have a landing board and wanted to have a way to reduce/close the entrance so I redesigned the Guardian to my specifications and 3D printed it. Here is a short video of the bees using the new entrance.


Swarm I added to this hive last Sunday is doing great. They are taking lots of syrup and making comb like crazy. I probably won't look in on them until Tuesday so I'll give another update then. Thanks for following along.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Dan - love your project. Well thought-out, well engineered - and well explained. Nice one.

Looking forward to hearing more, as life in this hive progresses. :)
LJ
Thanks little-john. Just so happens I am an engineer by trade so I over think and over design everything. Most of my hobbies came about because there was an element of engineering/design/build associated with them.

Peaked in on this hive on Saturday while I was inspecting the other hives and they are drawing comb like crazy and bringing in pollen and nectar. They do have access to feed in the hive, but they are not taking much, if any. I'm afraid I have a drone laying queen or she is missing all together because I saw what appeared to be multiple eggs in many of the cells. There were single eggs in some. I haven't laid eyes on the queen yet but they are awful calm and quite for a queenless hive. I plan to give them a few more days and re-inspect. Should I continue to see multiple eggs in cells, I will re-queen the hive.
 

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I recently got an itch for a long hive and after quite a bit of research, I dove in head first. But first, let me provide a little background. I've been keeping bees since 2012 just as a hobby. I'm not trying to sell honey nor bees, just simply for enjoyment and personal knowledge. I have several Langstroth hives located in two different yards. One yard is in my backyard and the other is a few miles away at my Dad's farm. I've had successes and failures over the years. Most of my failures were early on and most were of my own making. The worst one was in the summer of 2014. I had a hive here at the house that exploded with bees and honey. It had 3 deep brood boxes and 7 or 8 medium supers. My son was playing on a travel lacrosse team that summer and between working, taking him to Atlanta everyday for practice and then traveling all over the SE on the weekends to tournaments, I just kept adding supers because I didn't have time to do anything else. Well, most of you can imagine what happened, yep, SHB. They destroyed the entire hive. I was sick and it almost made me quit the hobby. But, I vowed to carry on and learn from my mistake. Since then, I've kept the hives under control, pulled supers when needed and more or less let the bees do their thing. So far no treatments, not because I am against it, but it hasn't been needed, yet ( I just jinked myself, probably).

A couple months ago I stumbled across one of Dr. Leo's videos on u-tube and became quite intrigued with the long hive concept, something new and challenging. My research ensued and brought me back to here (Beesource) where I discovered quite a bit of information, especially from GregV and Little John. As a side note, I wish I understood the Russian language because I've learned quite a bit watching all the videos GregV has provided while muted. I can only imagine what I might learn if I could actually understand what the hell they were saying :D Anyway, I decided to build two horizontal hives, a modified Layens and a double deep Langstroth. This thread is about the Langstroth, I'll start another one for the Layens.

I like to start projects off with my givens and druthers:

Givens
  • Langstroth Compatibility
  • Double deep
  • Able to use existing extractor
  • Multiple hive capability

Druthers
  • Use Langstroth deep frame dimensions
  • Allow stacking of supers
  • Gable roof
  • Multiple entrances
  • Controlled airflow
  • Control SHB

Woodworking and 3D design are a couple other hobbies I enjoy, so I put those to work and came up with this:


View attachment 54563

That design turned into this:

View attachment 54565 View attachment 54567 View attachment 54571

Here is the double deep frame. The top is a standard deep Lang and the bottom is a deep Lang with a modified top bar. The two are zip tied together. The inspiration for this frame and the zip ties came from GregV. Thanks, Greg.

View attachment 54573

I installed bees this past Sunday, a swarm I caught during a rain storm. I'll keep a log here of how this hive does over the summer and winter. All comments and questions and constructive criticism welcomed.
Take a look at one my favorite channels (fresh video just came through) - West Siberian keeper runs the proper AMM bee in square Dadants (stationary yard in a forest).
Of notice, he likes to experiment (and why I like him!)

In this video he specifically talks of the large frame (that double-deep size that you have).
He has been running the experiment for few years now and wants to expand the large frame - he likes is so much.
Also notice - this beek just runs wide (35mm - 1 3/8") side bars all way through - he also likes this design - no fidgeting with the Hoffman's hacks.

The large frame he demonstrates starting 12:00 (before that point - spring inspection of regular Dadants, if interested).
He specifically wanted to make a video section about large frame inspection as he said.
Englush subs are available; I checked.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lzx5BKGy8I
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Great video, Greg. Thanks for sharing. I've considered designing a frame that would accept two deep foundation sheets, no intermediate center bar, to use strictly in the brood chamber. Only problem is it prevents me from transferring resources between hives if needed. Once I get a few of these deep hives going, I may give that a try. So far, I really like the deep hive. Bees seem to be happy doing their thing and its simple and quick to inspect.
 
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