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At what level filter will it not remove the pollen?
I am currently using a 'Double Sieve' from Mann Lake, not sure what micron that is? I also have a 400 micron filter that I am reluctant to use.
 

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varies based on type of pollen....my guess is 400 micron won't catch most pollen grains, I think pollen <100 is common.
 

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On some of the plastic mesh screen sets the mesh size is referred to as micron size: confusing and incorrect. I use Mann Lake 600 for final filter but usually put it through the coarser 400 first. Some people want to see the white layer atop the honey others think of it as scum. Depends on who you want to please!
 

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Some people want to see the white layer atop the honey others think of it as scum. Depends on who you want to please!
The white layer is just foam....air right or are you talking about something else? Typically the foam settles out soon after the extraction process. I wait atleast 24hrs in a hot room before bottling. The state fair for example, will penalize entries that have any white foam. Its a very easy thing to avoid.
 

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600 micron is more coarse than 400 micron.
I agree. The finest filter from Mann Lake is labeled 600 micron though and the coarsest is labeled 200. I am sure that is not correct. I dont know if they are all mislabeled or only the set I have. Hole opening gets smaller as the descriptive number gets smaller in the micron system. In mesh per inch sizing system, the larger the descriptive number the smaller the particle size.

I was under the impression that pollen floated and was brought up with the bubbles to the top. I have seen a very small trace of darker sediment in the bottom of pails though. Dont know what that is.

http://www.beesource.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-270887.html
 

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More of an emulsion I believe. Pollen is suspended throughout the honey. I guess that would make it a suspension, not an emulsion. Anyway, no, it doesn't float to the top or sink to the bottom.

That stuff in the bottom of the bucket is fine dirt particles.
 
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