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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My son (10yr old) and I did our weekly inspection of our 1 month old hive, yesterday. It looked good to me... but, I don't really know what I'm looking at.

There seems to be a lot more bees! They are working hard building comb and capping most frames. There were only a few drone cells, but the rest looked like photos I have seen. I added a second deep with pierco frames two weeks ago - they are working on them slowly.

I think we saw the queen - - she was BIG! However, I really don't know if I saw any eggs or larva because I didn't want to pick apart the comb. My frames are black pierco, so I found it hard to see.

I didn't see any ants, beetles, etc. I'm feeding 1:1 sugar with HBH. They are still drinking it up!

We are happy with the progress, but a little anxious to do it right. We just want them to be healthy.

*** My son got stung in the face, swelled like a golf ball, looks like he has a wad of chew! He came running over to see the queen, without taking the second to put his hood back on. Ooops! Rookie mistake.
 

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He'll live. We all have our rookie mistakes. There are a few quick remedies for stings. One of them is fresh sliced onion on the sting.

2nd deep already ?

Use the 7/10 rule to decide when to add another deep. 7 frames full out of 10 minimum. The 2nd deep may be used for honey/pollen storage if added too soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I installed a nuc into the bottom deep and added the frames to make 8 frames in a 10 deep box. They filled that like wildfire. So, a couple weeks ago, I added a second deep box with all 10 frames.

The first deep, with only 8 frames, has some wild looking comb on one of the frames (that had the extra space). It looks healthy, just different from the frames that are closer together.

My son is fine! Proud of his "battle wounds". He loves being a beekeeper! I'll keep the onion in mind, sure to have more stings.

We've just got to get with a local club and get some experience. I have never seen the inside of a hive - except my own! So, as the thread is titled:
Don't know what I'm looking at.
 

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I find it very easy to see eggs on that black foundation. But, it does take practice to learn what you are looking for. Try to get the sun behind you, let it shine over your shoulder and trun the frame so you can see all the way into the bottom of the frame. You will see the eggs in the very bottom, they look like small pieces of rice. I use the black foundation in my brood for that very reason.
 

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Sounds like your hive is doing just fine. It is really easy to get worried when you read on this forum about all of the things that can go wrong with your bees. There sure isnt anything wrong with a little dumb luck once in a while. Just keep watching and observing.

Speaking of luck......golf ball size swelling to the face is extremly fortunate, condsidering the alternatives (softball size or volley ball size anyone?)
 

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You should put all ten framed in the bottom deep. You will have to scrape out the wild comb. Things will get out of control if you don't. You do not necessarily need to find the queen or eggs. You should be seeing different stages of brood in the frames, usually in the middle of the hive. johng's post is good instructions, check it out! Some eggs may be visible, some brood should be easier to locate. Drone cells have a domed cap. Worker cells are relatively flat. Honey is capped with flat white wax. Pollen is not capped.
When you do your inspection remove the outermost frame and set it aside. That will give you room to work. Never pull a frame straight up out of the hive without first making room to work. You could "roll your queen" When putting everything back be sure to push the frames tight up against each other and leave equal spacing between the last frames and the side of the box.
It is awesome that you and your boy can enjoy this most interesting hobby together. I try to get the beesuit on anyone that comes to visit!
 
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