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I did an inspection today and this is what I found.
Little to no honey.
Some pollen.
Not a lot of bees but this hive was never that strong.
I saw what I fear is some kind of disease maybe AFB?
What do you think?
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Looks bad for European Foulbrood. Do a search for symptoms and better pictures. notice discolored greyish twisted larva and some slumped in cell bottoms.
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No, that's not normal. Difficult to say what OP has, looks like that queen is garbage.

What is your mite count OP - did you do a mite wash - could you tell us how many mites / 300 bees?
 

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@crofter that's an extremely mild case of EFB in your photos ....

see below a more obvious case of EFB, which isn't really what OPs photos look like.

IDK what OP has - I would love to know what the mite wash is, could be PMS>
 

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This is European foulbrood:

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@crofter that's an extremely mild case of EFB in your photos ....

see below a more obvious case of EFB, which isn't really what OPs photos look like.

IDK what OP has - I would love to know what the mite wash is, could be PMS>
I wish I had caught it when it was an even milder case. Picture below is some of the five colony's more advanced frames!

When EFB has been going on for a while you are likely to find a very low mite level: If most larvae are not getting to, or beyond capping stage mite reproduction and numbers quickly go negative.
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Crofter that is a sad sight to see for sure, one of those evil necessities for sure.

Sorry for the loss.
 

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Crofter that is a sad sight to see for sure, one of those evil necessities for sure.

Sorry for the loss.
In disgust I euthanized and burned several hives, boxes and all, until I confirmed it was not American foulbrood. At that time the antibiotics were still available without the Veterinary prescription and I dosed them with Oxy Tet. I sealed up 5 hives and put them in shed for several years but eventually buried the frames and scorched the boxes. I did not have it return in the 4 years since. Others have not been so lucky!

If you catch it at the first sign of discolored milk surrounding larvae and only a few twisted "bellyache" larvae before they start to slump into cell bottoms, then it is much easier to stop.
Once it starts to jump colony to colony it is a tough proposition.

I hope this is not what the OP is dealing with but in any case, know the symptoms and automatically check for them any time you have your eyes on a frame of brood. It takes only a second to spot when you are familiar with it.

Somebody recently, maybe grozzie2, that looking at the larva and how well it is being fed, is a forecast of how healthy your colony will be 2 weeks from now. Capping patterns are good to look at but larval feeding is a fair jump ahead in value.
 

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EFB chalkbrood, etc etc, can be cured out of a frame with ozone. No need to burn anything.
 

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ozone will kill AFB spores.............hhhmmmm.
I'm with Crofter on this one, references?
 

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Well the study did show it kills AFB, but I would definitely not use ozone to cure AFB out of frames or boxes.

EFB chalkbrood, pesticides, etc etc are all very likely cured by ozone.

Still remains to be known if ozone damages the wax comb.
 

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Commercial operations clearly need safe and inexpensive fumigants that can treat pallets of supers, yet leave no residue. Dr. Pernal found that isopropyl alcohol, Apilife VAR, paradichlorobenzene, and drugstore 3% hydrogen peroxide were fairly effective (but that there was variation in susceptibility between strains of spores). I’ve spoken with Dr. Rosalyn James about her experiments with using ozone as a sterilant against other pathogens, and am myself currently working on setting up a small trial to test its efficacy against nosema spores.
His footnotes give another reference:
Currier, IP, et al (2001) Deactivation of clumped and dirty spores of Bacillus globigii. Ozone Science & Engineering 23:285-294.
 

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I think the statement made in post # 11 a bit forward thinkin as far as being practical or presently available to beekeepers. Did you note the price? I think 3 days exposure may have been needed to deactivate AFB. It was not determined what its effect was on nosema.
 

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I think the statement made in post # 11 a bit forward thinkin as far as being practical or presently available to beekeepers. Did you note the price? I think 3 days exposure may have been needed to deactivate AFB. It was not determined what its effect was on nosema.
The understatement of the week is calling it a bit forward thinking! You are very generous.
Forget it as a treatment option.

The study claims clearly: " P. larvae was not very susceptible to ozone."
Effective treatment required a high ozone concentration, 3 days exposure, combined with 50C temperatures and >75% relative humidity.

How about that price tag, in 2010 dollars no less?
 

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EFB and PMS. Not normal and not healthy.
A doomed colony and infected equipment is the result.

May want to call in a experienced beekeeper or state inspector to help you get past this issue.
 

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I think the statement made in post # 11 a bit forward thinkin as far as being practical or presently available to beekeepers. Did you note the price? I think 3 days exposure may have been needed to deactivate AFB. It was not determined what its effect was on nosema.
To further muddy this thread. This 2001 Australian report 01-051.pdf states that 10 minutes in wax at 150° to 160º Celsius will "render all AFB spores non-viable". Does not seem to mention any other disease or bee pest.
 

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I wonder if it makes it "non-viable" or just encapsulates it?
 
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