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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
There is a 100 acre soy bean field thats about 1000 yards away from my hives and i was wondering if soybeans made good honey and if so How do you know when to add the supers?? The crop is about 3 foot high right now! I thought they usually bloomed in June or july!

Right now i have left a super on 2 hives about a mth ago, it was right at the end of the flow when i added the supers & everything slowwed down completely and i just left the supers on the hives since they didnt draw any comb on the new foundation plus i figured there would be a flow in the fall. I havent feed the bees for about a mth, they been doin good on their own! Tomorrow i will be going to check the 2 hives.
 

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it depends on what kind of beans they are the ones with blue and purple blooms produce greater amounts than the white blooms but either way 100 acres you should see a good flow. and are they earily or late beans late beans in kansas are just know starting to bloom
 

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Excellent honey when it flows. I've learned not to count on it though. I'm set up for it with empty supers on all my hives but I've only gotten soybean honey one of my 4 years so far ('07). I've got over 500 acres around me from various farmers, planted at different times and possibly different types. If there's a flow of any type I'll get it, but nothing so far. I believe it was ABJ that had an article on how soybeans were fickle. They counted on the right temp, the right moisture, and the right beans to get honey. If any of those are off you get nothing.
 

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Next year the 100 aces could be corn. Ever since i could remember, the farmer would rotate back and forth. The land just sold last year so i was kind of concerned what they was gonna use the area for or if they was gonna plant anything at all. I just thought about maybe asking around to find out who owns the land now and ask them what specific type of soybean did they plant. i could probably tell him that i have bee hives really close within flying distance and perhaps get lucky with a huge field of white clover..hahaha my wishful thinking!!
 

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Around here there is a mix of all kinds of beans. Some grow tall, some short, some bloom and produce beans along time, others bloom and are done,,,I've seen some that were planted about 3 weeks ago,,late beans,,,I can't figure it out:scratch:

Rick SoMd
 

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I have ten hives on soybeans right now, and in two weeks they nearly filled 2 shallow supers each. Get to check on them tomorrow to see how they're doing on the third super... man, I've got my fingers crossed!!! Not sure which variety of bean they are though... guess I ought to ask.
Regards,
Steven
 

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Paint me green with envy.;) If you do ask them, PLEASE get the actual producer (Monsanto, Dekalb, etc) as well as the actual type and let us know. I've never been able to get that as the people running the equipment (whom I asked) don't know that info. They merely know they are putting in "beans."
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here is an article i found doing an online search trying to find out answers to my question. It still doesnt state what specific variety of soybean. I would like to know which soybean does have a good nectar source out of the variety that is available to the farmer!
Article: The soybean, considered self-fertile, can be a significant source of nectar for honey production. However, there are quite a few varieties of soybeans being grown now; and some varieties produce enough nectar for honey bees to produce a surplus of honey, and some do not. The result for the beekeeper is that soybean may be an erratic nectar source, changing from year to year depending upon the varieties of soybeans grown in the area surrounding the bee yard. The variety of nectar rewards offered to the honey bee may explain the difference in results of studies of increases in soybean crop yield for soybeans pollinated by honey bees. Results have been measured from zero to 30 percent increases in soybean yield when honey bees are present for added pollination. A 16 percent increase is the most common finding. Soybean farmers and beekeepers both recognize the importance of the honey bee in helping to produce our food crops. Soybean honey, one of my favorites, is light amber in color and mild in aroma and flavor.
 

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Bio honey diesel,,,, hummm Naah :no:

I wonder if you could convince a farmer to grow the beans that are nectar producers,,,offer him little to no cost pollination,,,,and the likely hood he would get more bushels per acre???? Here the beans are coming on and there is little forage right now. Man whata deal that would be.

Rick SoMd
 

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Where's the article from and when? Rick, great idea. At this point I would even know what soybeans to recommend. Before I'd recommend anything that could affect their livelyhoodI'd need to do a cost benefit analyisis of what they cost versus other beans, are they harder or easier to take care of and what their normal production is versus production with bees.
 

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The biggest problem with soybeans (IMHO), and DCoates touched on it briefly with his mention of Monsanto, is that the VAST majority of soybeans planted in the good ole US of A are genetically modified. They're called (in the agricultural vernacular) RR for short, RoundUp Ready in other words.

Here's why *I* think that's bad medicine; Roundup is a systemic, non-selective herbicide. In other words it kills ALL green plants - EXCEPT, mysteriously, RR soybeans (and corn and some other bio-tech crops) that Monsanto, etal are trying to cram down the throats of unsuspecting Americans.

Pejorative? You betcha! Roundup is nasty bad stuff. Is it the sole cause of CCD? Nope, of course not, that's been well discussed in other threads. But how can it NOT be at least a PART of the cause? When THOUSANDS of acres of RR soybeans and corn are genetically wired to NEED roundup (or fail as a crop) and get their aerial 'fix' ... that's right, they spray the field from a 'crop duster' ... how can the bees (and other wildlife) NOT be affected for the worse? And who's to say that isn't part of the answer to the whole 'some soybeans produce nectar some of the time' dilemma? (Remember the old commercial; "It's not nice to fool Mother Nature"? ... more to the point, there's only One Creator and we're NOT Him :no: :eek: )

If genetic modification isn't the epitome of playing 'creator' I'd like to hear what IS!

We gotta get a grip on 'industrial agriculture' before it gets the :ws award of the year/century/milennium!

Peace,
Joseph
 

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Hey Green beek,
I don't doubt what you are saying true where you are,,,,I don't know...Here the farmers spray a herbicide,,,,roundup? I don't know,,,,but many work the same way,,,yes they are systemic,,,but my "understanding is that once the herbicide hits the ground,,,it is neutral..Now,, maybe that is Monsanto propaganda,,,the farmers here wait until the ground cover is dead,,, I mean brown and down,,,then they drill the beans in. I'm not sure if you meant it but I got the impression that "round up ready" meant the beans could be sprayed with the herbicide with no effect and therefore it was in the beans. I don't know,,,,perhaps you could explain it further..Thanks

Rick SoMd
 

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Roundup ready plants have been genetically modified so that they can be sprayed with roundup at any time during the growing season. Any and all plants, weed or otherwise growing in that field will be killed by the roundup, however the genetically modified crop plant, beans, corn, alfalfa for example will be uneffected by the herbicide.

Blueline
 

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Rick,

I wish it was as benign as spraying, waiting, then planting the desired FOOD crop ... sadly, they have modified soybean, corn, alfalfa and other FOOD crops to be tolerant of (able to withstand application of) RoundUp, which does kill ALL OTHER green plants that are touched by it.

Here's just one Googled article: http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Monsanto_and_the_Roundup_Ready_Controversy

Continue reading on this - it's part of our education on beekeeping - and you'll stop buying grocery store stuff. Most all 'partially hydrogenated soybean oil' comes from RR beans (first or primary ingredient in most all salad dressings and 'fake' butter-like substances) and almost all HFCS (high fructose corn syrup) is from GM corn. Scary stuff indeed! :eek:

Peace,
Joseph
 

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WOW :eek: Been outa touch with ag for a while. Like I said I didn't know. So,,are there some that spray and plant and those that plant and spray,,,and are the ones that spray wait and plant any better?

Rick
 

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Round-Up is NOT systemic.

Round-Up will NOT kill all green plants. It is popular because it works on so many weeds, and you have a larger window of opportunity to apply it than with other chemicals.

Round-Up is very poor on broadleaf plants. That is why farmers mix 2,4-D in with the Round-Up for a good burndown spray. (2,4-D is a broadleaf killer.)

Round-Up is very poor on native plants in my area, but it does good on many invasive non-native weeds.

Round-Up resistance was bred into soybeans. The gene for Round-Up resistance was spliced into corn. You have to be very careful when applying Round-Up to corn, as Round-Up will stunt (or kill) Round-Up Ready corn if your Round-Up concentration is too much.

A total kill off of all vegetation in a field is known as a burndown. You chemically burn down all the vegetation. It is common for farmers to do this prior to no-till planting. Farmers typically use more than one chemical to do a burndown, as one chemical will not work on everything.

You also see farmers do a fall spray after harvest. They are applying residual herbicides that stay in the soil and break down slowly. The field will be bare of weeds all winter and early spring. Without vegetative cover, the soil warms up faster, so the farmer can plant and have the crop germinate earlier. Round-Up is not a residual herbicide - it has to be applied directly to the leaf.

You will also see farmers spray Round-Up (usually without other chemicals) after the crop has emerged from the soil. You ideally apply it right before the crop canopies over the soil, so you kill the weeds and the crop with shade out any new weeds that try to grow.

USDA certified organic farming allows Round-Up to be used as a burndown spray in some situations.
 

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Countryboy ... I stand corrected. Very informative. It sounds like you are speaking from hands on experience, so if my previous (or following) comments offended, I'm sorry.

Three points, then I'll get :eek:t: (this one, anyway):

RoundUp resistance being bred in (soybeans) or genetically spliced in (corn) is still monkey business where we ought not to be monkeying.

Farmer and RoundUp probably should not go in the same sentence. (Read the link in my first reply to Rick - especially the part about "Superweeds".)

"Organic" is not the first (nor only) thing USDA mucked up. (There is a widely available Look or Life Magazine ad from the 1950's paid for by USDA - read: taxpayers - that shows a "Leave it to Beaver" kinda housewife with an upbeat looking font and musical notes that imply she is singing: "DDT, it's GOOD for ME")

Peace,
Joseph
 

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RoundUp resistance being bred in (soybeans) or genetically spliced in (corn) is still monkey business where we ought not to be monkeying.

I won't argue that. If non-native invasive weeds hadn't been introduced, there wouldn't be the need for RR crops. It's hard to turn back the hands of time though.

Farmer and RoundUp probably should not go in the same sentence. (Read the link in my first reply to Rick - especially the part about "Superweeds".)

I disagree. Round-Up superweeds become a problem when Round-Up is abused. When farmers use Round-Up responsibly, superweeds do not become a problem.

Only a few counties away from me, they have found Round-Up resistant Giant Ragweed. Giant Ragweed is a non-native, invasive weed.

Superweeds result when farmers use Round-Up year after year with no chemical rotation. As soon as the farmer doesn't use Round-Up for a year, and uses a different chemical to kill the weeds, the weeds lose their Round-Up resistance. Superweeds only seem to build Round-Up resistance when they have constant exposure.

Superweeds remind me of the foulbrood resistant bees that were discovered at Dadant's wax rendering facility. They had a beeyard there, and over time, the bees became resistant to AFB. As soon as the bees were moved away, and were no longer facing constant AFB pressure, they lost the AFB resistance.

Interestingly, I have discovered that some heirloom tomatoes can withstand low doses of Round-Up. It will yellow and discolor new growth portions of the plant, but plants often survive low exposure from overspray and drift.
 
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