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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Friends,

My hive is south-facing and receives bright and warm winter sun. I am in the mid-Atlantic region, where winters can be pretty cold. I wonder whether the bees will think that it is warmer outside due to sun warming the hive, depart, and then freeze. Does that happen?

Micah
 

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yes, it can and does happen. You will find threads on this forum about bees flying out only to be found later lying on the snow. Don't worry though, you won't lose enough bees that way to matter. IMO, it's Darwin's theory at work. Your hives are facing in the 'correct' quadrant (east to south)

But D.C.? Some here might argue about whether that's not a semi tropical paradise compared to the northern climes. "Pretty cold" is relative. Right now it's 24F at my house. But later today it will be around 48F and bees might be flying. This is only late autumn and there are still a few late flowers.
 

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But D.C.? Some here might argue about whether that's not a semi tropical paradise compared to the northern climes. "Pretty cold" is relative. Right now it's 24F at my house. But later today it will be around 48F and bees might be flying. This is only late autumn and there are still a few late flowers.

Fair enough! :) Our average snowfall is only about 18 inches over the course of the winter--about half the snowfall as in Connecticut and a quarter of Minnesota gets around Lake Superior. The average low temp in the winter ranges from 25 degrees (January and February) to 35 degrees (November and March) but the average highs are usually at least in the mid-40s during the winter versus like 25 degrees as the high in Minnesota.

So I won't complain!

Meanwhile, my ladies have been pretty active most days bringing in pollen. . . .
 
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