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I'm up to 8 healthy hives and am having trouble remembering which ones are doing what...which queens I used and from where...and so on.

I was considering writing a number on the back of each hive with a POSCA marker and using a notepad to track progress.

Or using a note card that I attach to the hive in a plastic bag?

Maybe go freestyle, writing on the inner cover?

What methods have you found useful to keep record of your individual hives?
 

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last year I wrote on the top with a Sharpy. I worked great for me, except it rained so much last year the notes would fade in 2 to 3 wks.
This year I'm going to transfer any needed notes to paper after I'm finished with inspections. I don't have to deal with sticky honey or propolis on my paper or phone which ever I'm using.
 

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There are a million ways to do it, from pen and paper to computerized graphs. Just depends on what you want to do. I personally use beetight, and while it's a decent program for the geek in me, it's not perfect. It's $15/ yr. just my two cents.
 

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I saw in a video that Michael Palmer wrote on duct tape that was stuck on the lid, so he could see all his notes from the season while he was at each hive.

I would find a computer app a pain because I'd have to enter the info twice: once in the field and then again transfer it to my computer. But I am low tech person. I just use a notebook.

I did try Hivetracks and I didn't find it that useful for a small, stationary apiary like mine. It had way too much minute detail.

The other thing besides recording the info is making sure you can keep track of which hive is which. Each of mine is a different color - and I confess - has a different nickname which matches the color, (i.e. my green hive is called "Fern"). This makes things easy for me and my brain.

The only thing I am really rigid about recording are my mite drop numbers.

Enj.
 

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I don't keep records but the best one I heard about would be a brick that is painted different colors or engraved on each surface placed on top of the cover.

Things that don't change can be written in a note book before you get all sticky. I would mark the bottom boards. Less likely to be moved around.
 

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I am toying with the notion of using large washers and painting them different colors. Ex...a red washer means this hive needs to be checked often....a black washer means queen cells...etc. I could even place them in different places on top of the hive to signify different things. That way I can just walk down my row of hives and know what needs to be done rather than having to constantly consult a notebook. Not that I won't keep records in a notebook on some things, but many things don't actually need to be kept in records.
 

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I use one of those composition books like you use in school for notes on weather, condition of hive, etc by hive number. You can write the number on the hive with a permanent marker or use nail on numbers for each main deep or medium. I use the metal numbers like you put on a mail box post or your house (smaller numbers).
 

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If all want is to know what to do next time with a hive, I use a brick code.
A brick on edge needs a queen, one set toward the back left corner got a queen cell last time I was in the yard, back right time before that...I place the brick or a pebble in certain places and certain ways to let me know what I did/need to do/what condition of hive is.

When I'm experimenting ,I keep a note sheet in a document protector under the hive (if i used tele cover instead of migratory covers, I'd ut it btw the inner & outer covers).

Some folks just write on the top w/ a magic marker, and repaint it each year.
 

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There was a post a while back of a card that is laminated and a paper clip moved along to indicate what is up with hive. Looked like a good system. Hopefully someone good with search strings can locate and repost it:)
For now I use duct tape and bricks or rocks.
 
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