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I order a cypress hive and where I order it there website say you could paint it or you leave it with out paint and it will last along time. has anyone not paint a cypress hive and how did it do in the weather




thanks allan
 

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allan, I bought my boxes from Rossman, all cypress, but I don't think nobody's really selling any old growth stuff that will last a lifetime nowadays.

I painted all of my boxes...except for one. It has weathered a great deal over the last couple of years, darkening with mold and mildew and the naturally aging of the wood. I can't see it lasting as long as the other boxes being as it simply has not got that extra shell of protection.

Will the trouble and expense of painting be worth it in the long run?....time will tell. Some people say it will...some say it won't. What I feel confident in saying, though, is that the white painted boxes are cooler than the darker unpainted one....I haven't made any tests or anything but the darker box should readily absorb more solar energy than the white ones. Being here in south Alabama I wanted to help keep the temperatures down in the summer as much as I could. Whatever the case, I don't regret painting them and do feel that it has added a good bit of protection from the weather to them. Btw, do you trade any down at Sherwood's?

Best wishes,
Ed
 

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Only about half of my non-cypress supers are painted. At least half are plain, unpainted, untreated, weathered wood. Many were also acquired from a friend who was retiring from beekeeping, he had gifted me, about half of a pallet load, of unassembled 10-frame medium supers, that had been stored, outdoors, exposed to the weather, for many years before I acquired them. I continued to store the unassembled super components, and have assembled more of them, each year. Perhaps I will finish assembling them in the next few years. The unassembled supers, and those that have already been assembled are all holding up very well, these past twelve years, or so - that they've been with me.

In earlier years, I constructed a pair of sawhorses, with six inch wide top surfaces that were of one by (3/4" thick) cypress. They've also been outdoors here, and for a year or two in their earliest life, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. So they're probably twenty or more years old, now. One has warped a little, and both have weathered to a silvery-grey color, but seem as strong and solid as when I first made them.

Wish I could say the same for the perimeter of the deck on our porch and a frame and shingle roof on one of our sheds, they were both built, by the previous owner of our place, and primarily with OSB. That OSB is crumbling, and I'll guess that it wasn't rated for exterior use.

So my guess is that painting cypress is optional, unless your climate is extremely conducive to organic decomposition (warm/hot and wet/humid). If so, then perhaps that natural wood preservative (eco wood treatment), will be beneficial.
 

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allan,
I'm really not sure, I have heard the argument that today's cypress isn't the same as old growth cypress that gave cypress it's great reputation. But who knows, if I had to guess, I'd say paint.

However, there might be a good compromise solution, something in between doing nothing and painting. Have you considered using ECO wood treatment? They make some pretty remarkable claims as far as it's preservation capabilities. There's been a few threads discussing it...Most opinions I've read seem to like it but there didn't seem to be a lot of long term information. I decided to give it a try and dipped some of my new boxes this year...we'll see how they do.

My boxes are pine, however, I did have someone give me a couple of store bought cypress boxes which I decided to also dip...The ECO gives most wood, including cypress, a really nice, dark, aged look.
It's SUPER SIMPLE to use, mixes up with pretty much the consistency of water, dip your boxes and done!
Here's a look at the cypress boxes i dipped.
95CB269F-C560-473B-9961-0E2E1D382618_zps7sfdveie.jpg
 

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Mine are made from sinker cypress, which means trees that have been sitting at the bottom of a local river. The fellow that cut them and dried them in a kiln, said they would outlast regular cypress and that no painting is required. My OCD kicked in though and I am putting a coat of spar varnish on them...esp the end grain. Will probably outlast me.
1510984_10202824115540375_158073869_n.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
allan, I bought my boxes from Rossman, all cypress, but I don't think nobody's really selling any old growth stuff that will last a lifetime nowadays.

I painted all of my boxes...except for one. It has weathered a great deal over the last couple of years, darkening with mold and mildew and the naturally aging of the wood. I can't see it lasting as long as the other boxes being as it simply has not got that extra shell of protection.

Will the trouble and expense of painting be worth it in the long run?....time will tell. Some people say it will...some say it won't. What I feel confident in saying, though, is that the white painted boxes are cooler than the darker unpainted one....I haven't made any tests or anything but the darker box should readily absorb more solar energy than the white ones. Being here in south Alabama I wanted to help keep the temperatures down in the summer as much as I could. Whatever the case, I don't regret painting them and do feel that it has added a good bit of protection from the weather to them. Btw, do you trade any down at Sherwood's?

Best wishes,
Ed
yes I have been to Sherwood's a time or two



thanks allan
 

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allan,
Have you considered using ECO wood treatment? They make some pretty remarkable claims as far as it's preservation capabilities. There's been a few threads discussing it...Most opinions I've read seem to like it but there didn't seem to be a lot of long term information. I decided to give it a try and dipped some of my new boxes this year...we'll see how they do.

My boxes are pine, however, I did have someone give me a couple of store bought cypress boxes which I decided to also dip...The ECO gives most wood, including cypress, a really nice, dark, aged look.
It's SUPER SIMPLE to use, mixes up with pretty much the consistency of water, dip your boxes and done!
Here's a look at the cypress boxes i dipped.

Have used Eco Wood......it's junk. Boxes split and warp right around third year......
 

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Like Ed says, it has a lot to do with the cypress or type of cypress you are using. Old growth or old growth sinker cypress has more oils and therefore more rot and insect resistance than what I call pond or fresh cut cypress. I would say that no, you don't have to paint cypress, but painting will make the cypress last longer. I build a lot of historical exterior shutters and do renovation work on old panels as well, mostly cypress. There is a lot of variety in the cypress wood that is now available, overall I really like using it. On one project, we worked on panels made in 1830, which were still pretty solid. I will also add, be careful of some clear finishes. Spar varnish makes a beautiful finish, but many of our customers don't like the frequency it requires of sanding and repainting. Some varnishes have to be redone every few years, something that could be a headache if you have a lot of hives.
 

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I'd say paint. Better to be over-protected than find out in a couple years you should have and now have to replace the boxes. I'd much rather spend a couple bucks on good exterior latex paint and 20 minutes out in the fresh air than have to buy all new boxes every 3-5 years.
 
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