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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lined 10 new nucs up spaced about 2ft apart. They're all active, but the one in the center has a huge number of bees flying in front compared to the others. Wonder if it's just a combination of all the nucs trying to sort things out or if there's a problem. I noticed earlier that they were bearding up a bit on that nuc. Any ideas?
 

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Shaken in with new Russian queens.

Well, I think they were shaken in. To be honest I'm not certain. 4 frame, well populated, good laying pattern, lots of brood, etc.
 

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yes, nucs will swarm if they are overpopulated. Another thing to consider is that, when hives are lined up close together, at equal spacings, with no distinguishable features at the entrances, they will get confused and you will see some drifting. That middle hive may just be the recipient of foragers from other hives, although drifting tends to happen away from the center, and towards the ends of rows. One thing I would recommend is that when a colony has filled its nuc, it is time for a new house. Moving the bees into 8 or 10-frame hives will give them room to expand, and when they fill that space, add another brood chamber, and then honey supers and so on. Letting the bees feel cramped is a great way to instigate swarming!

justgojumpit
 

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Wouldn't that just be my luck. A boomer of a nuc, swarms while waiting on a shipment of hive bodies. Late yesterday it looked like the party had moved down the block a few doors. Maybe I'll get lucky.
 

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Well if you're worried about it, you could find a nuc that seems weaker than the others and switch places with the strong one. That will strengthen the weaker one and and reduce crowding of foragers in the stronger nuc.

JMHO

Dan
 
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