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From what I've been reading here and elsewhere , the basic premise of making queens from a known good queen is to "transplant" eggs from a normal sized cell into a larger "queen cell" so the nurses will feed her royal jelly and make her a queen . I know it's not that simple , and there is a lot involved in getting this to work , but when you boil it down to basics isn't that what you are doing ? :scratch:
 

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Not eggs, but one-day old larvae.
 

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That's pretty much it, in a nut shell for grafting , there are plenty of variations in techniques, etc, there are also methods to leave the larva alone in its original cell and either tricking or forcing them to convert them into queencells
 

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From what I've been reading here and elsewhere , the basic premise of making queens from a known good queen is to "transplant" eggs from a normal sized cell into a larger "queen cell" so the nurses will feed her royal jelly and make her a queen . I know it's not that simple , and there is a lot involved in getting this to work , but when you boil it down to basics isn't that what you are doing ? :scratch:
Your point being?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Your point being?
Well , if I'm going to be trying this one day , I think I need to understand the process . Not that it's likely to happen any time soon , but once the foundation is laid square and true a square and true house is much easier to build . Harley Craig and shinbone above were very helpful ... thanks guys !
 

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motive and opportunity.. grafting ..notching frames...
/THe state of the bees is the factor in making it happen. queenless(real or by design) and then making sure conditions are right ..Easier if you have bees correct age and great nutrition available.. Newly laid eggs or correct larvae placed in those conditions and presto they will take care of it for you .. Easy peazy
 

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Well , if I'm going to be trying this one day , I think I need to understand the process . Not that it's likely to happen any time soon , but once the foundation is laid square and true a square and true house is much easier to build . Harley Craig and shinbone above were very helpful ... thanks guys !
If you want a foundation of understanding, yes, basically correct, but there are plenty of basic knowledge books available. "Bee Sex Essentials" by Larry Connor being one of them. I hope that's helpful information too.
 

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If you want a foundation of understanding, yes, basically correct, but there are plenty of basic knowledge books available. "Bee Sex Essentials" by Larry Connor being one of them. I hope that's helpful information too.
Morning Mark. Sounds like you need a couple cups of coffee. He was just asking a question. There are some people out there that dont have the vast wealth of knowledge on all things beekeeping as we all know you have. Thanks for the book review. I will check it out. G
 

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He was just asking a question.
So was I. Others had already replied w/ the obvious correction so I saw no need to repeat that eggs aren't moved, but 1st day larva are.

I don't drink coffee. Do you think that if I did it would improve my personality or make my Posts seem less grumpy to readers? :) lol :lpf:
 

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I do not consider the difference the cell size. Although there is a difference in size many queens are started without removing the larva from the worker cell. As I understand it the motivating difference is the orientation of the cell. Vertical rather than horizontal.
 

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Is a plastic queen cup a bigger bore size than that cell which the larva came from? I never measured either.
 

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Generally, the bees will either rework the cells (the reason for notching in the OPS method) or, on fully drawn plastic or comb with lots of cocoons, they float the larvae out of the cell and build a queen cell that hangs off the comb.
Just look at any queen cell that a queen emerged from...they don't come out of worker sized cells....although they may start that way.
I do not consider the difference the cell size. Although there is a difference in size many queens are started without removing the larva from the worker cell. As I understand it the motivating difference is the orientation of the cell. Vertical rather than horizontal.
 

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If the difference were merely vertical vs horizontal, how would emergency queens be produced from already laid/hatched worker larvae??
I do not consider the difference the cell size. Although there is a difference in size many queens are started without removing the larva from the worker cell. As I understand it the motivating difference is the orientation of the cell. Vertical rather than horizontal.
 

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>I know it's not that simple , and there is a lot involved in getting this to work , but when you boil it down to basics isn't that what you are doing ?

No. Transferring larvae to a queen cup is just one step in queen rearing and it's not even a necessary step. It is helpful for raising MORE queens and queens of the genetics you want, but that can be done by a number of methods. What is essential in queen rearing is getting the bees to want to raise queen cells at all and preferably a LOT of queen cells. If you graft a bunch of cells and put them in some random hive at some random time you will most likely get no queens at all.

Here are the basic concepts of queen rearing:
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesqueenrearing.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Michael Bush;1154301 Here are the basic concepts of queen rearing: [url said:
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesqueenrearing.htm[/url]
Excellent ! I can see that I'll need more experience as a beekeeper before I try to make my own queens , but your article has it all laid out . Now I know what I need to study in more depth , which was the whole reason for this thread .

Many thanks to all those who responded , I now know just how ignorant I am , and what I need to study to correct that ignorance .
 

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Excellent ! I can see that I'll need more experience as a beekeeper before I try to make my own queens , but your article has it all laid out . Now I know what I need to study in more depth , which was the whole reason for this thread .

Many thanks to all those who responded , I now know just how ignorant I am , and what I need to study to correct that ignorance .
Often we end up getting the info we are searching for, if we ask enough people or sift through the answers and give clarification when asked. May I suggest thinking about what you really want to know before asking? And then spend some time figuring out how to ask your question so you get what you came for? The answers to almost all of your questions are out there. But quite often it helps if the person w/ questions knows something about the subject before asking.
 
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