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My hives all have at least a super (some have a deep) full of capped sugar syrup that they didn’t use over the winter. Do I need to worry about this syrup getting moved to honey supers when I add them? I’d rather not remove them if I don’t have to but I will if they will mix they syrup in with honey.
 

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My hives all have at least a super (some have a deep) full of capped sugar syrup that they didn’t use over the winter. Do I need to worry about this syrup getting moved to honey supers when I add them? I’d rather not remove them if I don’t have to but I will if they will mix they syrup in with honey.
not actually answering your question, but giving you another data point on this topic.

I have a couple of hives that came out of winter nicely and are building up fast, but not much in the way of drawn combs. I have been feeding lots of syrup this spring so that the bees will build comb for the coming nectar flow. In a week or so, I will take those 'super' frames off with any sugar honey they have in them, extract them, and put them back on the hives and not feed them any more syrup.

I bought an extractor from amazon for $128, and am surprised at the sturdiness of it. I'm fairly confident that it will be just fine for the small amount of work it will get with my modest amount of hives. I could have borrowed the local bee club's extractor, but is is a bit of a hassle to go pick up across town, do extraction, clean and return withing 2 days. We run a farm based day support for individuals with intellectual disabilities, it will be important for us to be able to do smaller batches of honey extraction through the season than to try to do one 'large' extraction day, so having an extractor available is important.

Sorry, off tract there for a moment. point was, I bought an entry level extractor now so that i could use it not only for cleaning out syrup from the frames, but also for the honey harvest to come (fingers crossed)

Don
http://www.fullpocketfarm.com/
https://www.facebook.com/fullpocketfarm/
 

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Definition of terms time. A super to me, means a box deep, medium or shallow that is above what you think of as the brood chamber. The brood chamber may consist of one or more boxes, three deeps are recommended in Minnesota. I would think in your relatively mild climate, one or two deeps or a deep and a medium should be adequate for wintering.

Now, if you have a super of stored white sugar above that, you need to remove and store those boxes for feed. If what you are calling a super is just above the single brood box, I would call them a brood box and let the bees turn that feed into bees. I would guess that you were trying to ensure that your bees did not starve over winter! That is laudable but I would guess you over did and are going to have to deal with the consequence.
 

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I will offer a hybrid answer. I am guessing that you are just coming out of your first winter. Congrats! If you are the type that can delay gratification, wrap those frames of capped sugar water and store them in your freezer, if possible. Leave a few in the deep for them to get to a good nectar flow. Use them next fall when you put them to bed. This season, add frames of foundation to replace what you have taken and let them draw out more frames for you. This will be a great advantage, next year. I assume there are some empty deep,drawn frames. Leave them in for her to lay in. If need be, you could extract the sugar water and place back in hive. If you need gratification this year, you can extract your honey super and have them fill with honey. But you will likely have to feed this fall. J
 
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