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with only 2 or 3 such cells it is more likely your colony is superceding their queen as opposed to having swarmed.

the cell in your picture appears to be pushed in on the side as if it may have gotten bumped during your inspection.

assuming one of those cells produces a new queen, and assuming the new queen gets mated successfully, it may be 3 - 4 weeks from when the photo was taken before you see new eggs/brood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry for the late response, but thanks.
It looks like it swarmed. My bee population went significantly down.

Now I have one more question: is it a good idea to put a new fertilized queen into the hive instead hoping for a new one. I can’t find a queen at all?
It’s been a week now.

Thanks again for all your help.
 

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what did the queen cells look like?

(probably) still capped?

or (maybe) small hole at the bottom indicated new queen emerged?

if you look at the bee math here, you will see that it may be a couple more weeks or longer before you can expect to see a new queen laying eggs:

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmath.htm

it's difficult to spot a small virgin queen, and sometimes they are out of the hive on a mating flight.

probably too soon to introduce a new fertilized queen, unless you damaged all of the queen cell during your inspections, (the one in your photo looked like it had been slightly crushed).
 

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They would likely kill an introduced queen. Like Squarepeg said, it may be 3-4 weeks before you know whether you have a new queen. She has to hatch, dry her wings, get mated and begin laying. It is important not to disturb this process. I would not go in the hive for another 2 weeks and check for eggs. Its hard to resist, but right now the hive needs to be left alone. Waiting will do no harm. If they fail to make a new queen, you will have time to purchase one which they would be more likely to accept. If you have another hive and do not see eggs/brood in two weeks, you could add a frame of eggs. This will suppress laying workers and give them another shot at making a queen. This advice is assuming that you had a laying queen earlier. Before this inspection, did you see eggs/brood? J
 
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