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Ok I am brand new at this and was gonna oreder some hives and materials. I was wanting to know if I order unassembled hives do I need a jig in order to put them together?

Thanks
Josh
 

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Ok I am brand new at this and was gonna oreder some hives and materials. I was wanting to know if I order unassembled hives do I need a jig in order to put them together?

Thanks
Josh

You don't need a jig. The only things I put together with a jig are frames because I like to do them ten at a time. It is certainly not required. The only absolutes are glue and a hammer, as far as I'm concerned.
 

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You don't need a jig for hive boxes. I use a square, wood glue, rubber mallet, and hammer. I have found that a long clamp that screws down tight most helpful when dealing with really tight fits. Some companies out there make really snug cuts...others are more liberal.

I graduated to a jig for frames, but went without for several seasons.

Spend your money on what you 'need' to have, then graduate to the 'nice' to have in a couple seasons...jmo.
 

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IMHO, the best way to make the super square is to measure diagonals and make them equal. Obviously, square them immediately after glueing and nailing.
 

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Ok I am brand new at this and was gonna oreder some hives and materials. I was wanting to know if I order unassembled hives do I need a jig in order to put them together?

Thanks
Josh
I do use a jig. It does make life easier. If you are only making a few and if the box is well made it should be easy to make it square . I use Titebond 11 glue. Ejoy your bees.
 

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Ok I am brand new at this and was gonna oreder some hives and materials. I was wanting to know if I order unassembled hives do I need a jig in order to put them together?

Thanks
Josh
Nope, no need for any kind of "jig" at all for putting them together. Some use jig's for the frames, some even use them for the boxes. I personally don't use a jig at all. I put the boxes and the frames together on top of my tablesaw. Boxes one at a time, frames 10 at a time. I use a crown stapler to put things together with as well. AIR is my friend.. lol.. You will find that you'll get in a groove of doing things your way and the real idea is to feel comfortable doing so. Once you get to that point, the rest is a breeze..
 

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I don't think you need a jig, glue or a square. I think you are better off investing in a couple of pipe clamps. If the boxes you buy are milled right it will come square. Certainly square enough for a bee hive.
 

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lots of good advise above, no jig needed for boxes but I do use a couple of short pieces of 1 1/2 inch angle iron and a couple of small "c" clamps to make things easier, it helps to not need 3 or 4 hands for the first 3 sides. work on a flat steady surface, I use a cheap delta home-owner type table saw... for frames it is easier and more consistent with a jig look up "ross frame assembly jig" it is real cheap and easy to make... years ago I built frames with hammer and nails, not much fun for me. air stapler or finish nailer makes for less time and nice square frames. I use tite-bond III for the little extra cost. ace is right a couple of pipe clamps sure help if stuff does not go smooth.
 

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When I bought my first hives I built boxes and frames using a hammer and a square. Since I was only looking at making perhaps 60 or so frames, I didn't even think of making a jig of any sort. It was not a big deal then, very low key especially since I only had to make enough frames to super a single hive and wait for the bees to draw out the comb before making more. When I realized I would be building hundreds of frames at a clip, I built the jigs. (In fact, I've been making all my woodenware including screened bottom boards, covers, hive boxes and frame parts too but that involves a bigger outlay in woodworking tools than you need to consider.)

Other than that I now use an air gun when assembling hive bodies, I still do it the same way as when I first started. I use Titebond III glue, nails and a square. I could probably be reasonably successful using only the glue or only the nails, I suppose, but not by omitting the square. I'm sure I could build a reasonably square box or frame by eye a lot of the time, all to save a few bucks on an extremely inexpensive framing square, but it would speak volumes about my character and tell the world I have a willingness to settle for a life of sloppy mediocrity. (A carpenter's square at Lowes is $6.98, lasts a lifetime, will be handy in countless projects far beyond beekeeping and tells people that you take some pride in what you do.)

I don't use them myself in assembling boxes, but if you are gluing only and not nailing, pipe clamps are useful in assembling hive bodies but if you glue and nail, or nail only, you don't need them at all. And how does one square up a frame with pipe clamps? ("Very carefully" is the punch line, I suppose.) You do need a square.

Wayne
 

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If you buy dado cut boxes from any outfit I have ever used and it has been several, I have never used a jig and I have never had one un square enough to being an issue. I just grip them between my knees and pay attention to which nail needs to go in next to pull the joints tight. I don't use a frame jig either but I have a bradnail/stapler and I need to keep me square then.
 

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I drive one nail in each end of all four boards, then square up the box and check to make sure it's flat. I then use the nails to pull the boards up tight. No need for a jig for a few boxes. If you are making hundreds, sure, you need a jig.

I do recommend TiteBond III though -- if you use enough to fill the gaps in the box joints, it will keep water out and they will last a lot longer.

Peter
 

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I have a piece of 1/2 inch plywood cut to just fit inside a box (super or hive body). They always get glued and nailed square.
Charlie
 

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I clamp one nice square hive body on its side to the work bench and use it as a jig to build against. As soon as they are assembled I stack them up and put enough weight on top to pull any crooked ones down while the glue sets. It's not like a musical instrument, but plenty good enough for bee boxes.

For frames I brush glue (titebond 3) on a whole bundle of parts at a time then assemble them against a square and gently stack them until they dry. That is probably really good enough, but for good measure I shoot narrow crown staples into the joints after they are dry. This is pretty fast for mann lake frames because they are machined accurately enough that they assemble easily and stay square until the glue dries. I have used others that were too loose for this to work.
 

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Irwin quick grip clamps and a square are helpful.
 

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And how does one square up a frame with pipe clamps?
You need a square to square up a frame? Are you saying if the frame was 1/32 out of square the bees wouldn't use it or there would be some other problem that would make it useless?

Build the box first and you will have your square. Add a couple of spacers and you will have your jig.
 

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While an assembly jig is not required for assembling frames, it can be very handy if you are going to assemble a lot of frames. And with 10 frames in each box, it doesn't take very many boxes to justify the effort of acquiring/building a frame jig. If you are so inclined, Beesource offers plans to make your own ....
http://www.beesource.com/build-it-yourself/10-frame-assembly-jig/

I'm pleased with the one I built from recycled lumber from those plans:


(The small bungee cords and the wood extensions they are attached to are not part of the plans. I made modifications because I didn't have the springs listed in the plans, and the bungee cords were available.)


In spite of Ace's disparaging :eek: of the value of glue in post #8 >> Don't forget the GLUE! << :rolleyes: Titebond works well .... :)

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