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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday, by taking honey frames from one hive, bees attacked me like crazy! :mad: :mad:
Some bees got into my suit, couldn't figure out where they got in, changed into a zip on veil, still bees got in and ended up with about 20 stings around my neck hair face etc after I was done clearing the bees inside the suit and start over again about 4 times until I was done just with that only one hive!
That's no fun, I know, should re - queen, she is around 2 years old, I want to just let her die out. This hive produced about 5 deep honey
this year, well...I don't care about honey anymore, I want peace!

Today, finally came to the conclusion, the bees could only go into the helmet vent slots. Did some of you had this happened too?
I'm going to attach screen mesh to the vent slots and see.

Konrad
 

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konrad, those vent in the top helmet will let bee's through, I had to duck tape mine up because I would get a head full of bee's borrowing in my hair, might have just been a bad day for them, just protect your self and do what you got to do ...... I dont use the vent hat and vail anymore, I bought me a hobbiest puul-over from betterbee with a zip on cloth hood and only problem I have had so for is when I forget to zip the dang thing up, has happened a few times... ;)
 

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When you take honey "frames", you can stir up the bees.
When you take off honey by the super, the bees are much
less likely to go after you.

If they waited to get defensive until you started tearing
their hive apart, they can't be AHB. If they get defensive
just because you are in the same time zone, then you
have AHB.


Edmonton AB? Very little chance of AHB making their
way there unless multiple people screwed up along the
way.

...and yeah, pith helmets suck. Get a hood type veil.
 

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I have a hive of bees with that "personality", but they have never been treated for mites in about nine years or so, and keep on ticking, so I leave them alone. Needless to say, I always gear up fully when I visit their home. My first dealings with them left me with about forty stings and kept me down for about three days.
 

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I'd consider it pretty normal for a normal EHB hive to get defensive when opening the hive and pulling supers in a dearth or even when they've been cooped up from the rain or any other external problems. Like Jim said, if they didn't get defensive until you opened it, that's not abnormal. If they pour out of the hive at you before you open it, that's a hot hive that needs a new queen.
 

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Once in central mexico I encountered a bee hive so sensitive that for the crime of being within twenty yards I got chased down the road and stung five times. I wasn't a beekeeper at the time, and I was very frightened of bees for quite a while. Coming out at me when I open the hive is expected. Chasing me down the road is not. I'd say you don't have AHB.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you all!

This was my second honey pull of the season and conditions where the same as last, nice sunny and warm with still nectar coming in.
The other 4 of my 5 hives where a little more defensive then last time, why?
Do bees know the season is coming to an end and therefore acting accordingly?

>>When you take off honey by the super, the bees are much
less likely to go after you.

I always wanted to learn,....how do you know comb is capped when super full of bees?
A local keeper said, he lays the super on its side on the ground and bees will clear in a couple of hours.....not for me!
I was thinking using a blower some day,... is that a good thing?
Konrad
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Can someone answer my last question please.
Konrad
 

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>Today, finally came to the conclusion, the bees could only go into the helmet vent slots. Did some of you had this happened too?

I've got a spare plastic beekeeper's helmet I picked up at a yard sale for 25 cents, it has what I thought were rather large vent slots. When I looked at it I thought that persistent bees could squeeze through the holes if motivated enough. I've watched bees squeeze through some pretty small openings. I've never tried it on the bees. Probably wont. My wife wears it in the garden for sun protection.

As for your last question, I've never used a blower but I know people who swear by them. I'd think there's be a whole lot of angry bees flying around using a blower, but it gets them out. I just stack the supers on an escape board and let them clear out overnight. If I was in more of a hurry I'd use Bee-Quick.
 

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Konrad sezs:
I always wanted to learn,....how do you know comb is capped when super full of bees?
A local keeper said, he lays the super on its side on the ground and bees will clear in a couple of hours.....not for me!
I was thinking using a blower some day,... is that a good thing?

tecumseh replies:
well as to your first question (I think).... when I break the boxs apart I take a quick look at the bottom of the frames. Since the frames are typically capped from the top down when the bottom sides of the frames are capped the entire box is capped.

I think what someone was trying to suggest is that breaking the frames free of the box gets a great deal of honey smell in the air. During a strong flow this is of little problem. When the flow weakens to a trickle this same activity will get the bees in a frenzy.

As to your last question. We used blowers exclusively during my tour of duty in North Dakota. They worked fine there. An accessory stand (for setting the honey super on) and baffle (that directed the bees back to their entrance) seemed to make this whole process much less disrupting than one might initially think.

hope that helps Konrad.
 
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