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I searched "Michael Palmer mouse guard" on YouTube, and came up empty. But I think his mouse guard method deserves a video, so I made one:


You can buy fancy, expensive mouse guards from the bee supply stores, or you can make your own for super cheap. All you need is:

- 1/2" hardware cloth
- Tinsnips
- 2 boards or bee boxes to bend the hardware cloth with


Step 1: Cut a strip of hardware cloth that is three squares wide and whose length matches your entrance.

Step 2: Put the strip in between the two bee boxes to hold it, and use the straight edge to bend it exactly down the middle lengthwise. It should be a right angle or a "v" shape.

Step 3: Carefully push it into your entrance, with the angle of the "v" pointing towards the inside of the hive. The sharp points of wire will dig in to the wood and hold it securely.


I think I'm going to leave mine on year round. (Not sure what Mr. Palmer does). Do comment on that.


Notes: It seems mice can go through 1/2 inch squares, so it's very important to bend it. Bending it makes the holes smaller head-on.

Some people use 1/4 inch hardware cloth (not bent), but apparently it knocks the pollen pellets off the bees' legs when they go through it, so you can't leave it on. You could possibly use 1/4" to make a pollen trap. (Someday I'm going to try that.)

You can also use 3/8" not bent, but they only sell it in bulk. Maybe I should buy a big roll, and sell pieces to other beekeepers?

Note to self: Hive stands will not stop mice. "Mice climb better than monkeys." You need a mouse guard.
 

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Take your standard entrance reducer and shoot brad nails through it at 3/8” or 10mm intervals. Cut the brad nails off even with the edge. Bees will come and go just fine. Mice can’t get through.
 

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S(he) was found dead inside. Possibly was in there when I put it in place. Rather bloated up; shrews can get through holes down to 3/8 ". That system is what I have been using for 10 years with no problems. Dont forget to put a couple of deck screws in the face for handles for when you pull them to clean dead bees. They can get stuck in with propolis or ice and jammed up with drones.
 

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I searched "Michael Palmer mouse guard" on YouTube, and came up empty. But I think his mouse guard method deserves a video, so I made one:


You can buy fancy, expensive mouse guards from the bee supply stores, or you can make your own for super cheap. All you need is:

  • 1/2" hardware cloth
  • Tinsnips
  • 2 boards or bee boxes to bend the hardware cloth with


Step 1: Cut a strip of hardware cloth that is three squares wide and whose length matches your entrance.

Step 2: Put the strip in between the two bee boxes to hold it, and use the straight edge to bend it exactly down the middle lengthwise. It should be a right angle or a "v" shape.

Step 3: Carefully push it into your entrance, with the angle of the "v" pointing towards the inside of the hive. The sharp points of wire will dig in to the wood and hold it securely.


I think I'm going to leave mine on year round. (Not sure what Mr. Palmer does). Do comment on that.


Notes: It seems mice can go through 1/2 inch squares, so it's very important to bend it. Bending it makes the holes smaller head-on.

Some people use 1/4 inch hardware cloth (not bent), but apparently it knocks the pollen pellets off the bees' legs when they go through it, so you can't leave it on. You could possibly use 1/4" to make a pollen trap. (Someday I'm going to try that.)

You can also use 3/8" not bent, but they only sell it in bulk. Maybe I should buy a big roll, and sell pieces to other beekeepers?

Note to self: Hive stands will not stop mice. "Mice climb better than monkeys." You need a mouse guard.
That's what I do, I can't get them on yet because of all the yellow jackets, and robber bees.
 

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I never used those as i was using an oav wand and it was a pain. invested in mass produced ones that i run on all my bottom boxes all year long. I've had mice in every season so i did something about it.
 
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