Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the process of making a honey extractor. Brute 32 gallon container, bike rims, threaded rod, some bearings, bolts + washers and a wooden bit of board for the bottom, powered by a drill. Found the design on youtube. I am not sure what to treat the parts with to qualify it as "food grade" and safe for consumption.

Link to video
https://youtu.be/P3EMnhan_68
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,251 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
A drill will work, but I found that a motor from a treadmill will allow much more control over the speed. The control circuit input is AC and converts the power to DC to drive the motor. This provides more torque to get the extractor up to speed quicker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,788 Posts
A programmable speed controller won't break as many frames. Over 15 minutes, it accelerates from 1 rpm when they're still heavy with honey to about 30 rpm when they're almost dry. Of course some designs will be better off slower, others can tolerate faster.

I cringe to think of a drill motor jerking 72 frames up to full speed while they're heavy!:pinch:

It's best to err on the side of conservative (= too slow, not too fast!!!) until you have all the kinks worked out.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What parts of the extractor should I coat with the epoxy? the wood at the bottom obviously, does the metal parts have to be coated or just kept clean?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,251 Posts
Well, I'm not convinced the wood needs to be coated with Camcote. After all, the honey is {likely} in wood frames, and while there is a layer of wax, once you uncap the cells and spin them in the extractor, the honey will be flung against the wood of those frames. If honey in contact with wood is not food safe, then you might as well give up on extracting and just sell cut comb.

The most common use of Camcote is to coat {older} galvanized extractors. If you choose to use only stainless metal parts (bolts, threaded rod, bar, etc) then you won't have any galvanized metal to use Camcote on. Use wood and the Brute for the non-stainless parts.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top