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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that you should not disturb a hive with a newly emerged virgin queen until after she has been laying for a while. Two weeks seems to be the "standard".
I have a hive I split with a Snelgrove board and she should have emerged Friday or Saturday. I would like to get into the mother hive below and fetch 2-3 frames of brood and some nurse bees for a split. Normally I would not think of doing this but I have a purchased queen that I have had for a week that I no longer need. This hive is my only option to get brood from right now.
I could attach the Snelgrove to the box above and move as a unit so as to minimize disturbance. I fear I am on the cusp of the new queen doing an orientation flight and not far from mating flight. I would love to get away with this,but not sure if it's worth the risks.
As always, I appreciate your thoughts and opinions. J
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Try to gather the frames of brood early in the am, like 9 am or so. And, move the hive body and Snellgrove board as a unit. You should be fine. I think leaving the new queen alone until she is laying is the most preferable, but a slight disturbance is not a guarantee of failure. If it were, I would not have as many bees.
 

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How hard would it be to put a barrel or a few deeps approximate the same height behind the existing stack so you just have to slide or swing it back a short distance. Her entrance landmark would not be much misplaced. I have moved the whole assembly off quite a few times but never that close to critical.

A bit of duct tape for insurance to make sure the board stays tight with the upper box and do the deed early in the morning as JWP suggests. I think the odds are slim that you would foul her up.
 

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I know that you should not disturb a hive with a newly emerged virgin queen until after she has been laying for a while. Two weeks seems to be the "standard".
I have a hive I split with a Snelgrove board and she should have emerged Friday or Saturday. I would like to get into the mother hive below and fetch 2-3 frames of brood and some nurse bees for a split. Normally I would not think of doing this but I have a purchased queen that I have had for a week that I no longer need. This hive is my only option to get brood from right now.
I could attach the Snelgrove to the box above and move as a unit so as to minimize disturbance. I fear I am on the cusp of the new queen doing an orientation flight and not far from mating flight. I would love to get away with this,but not sure if it's worth the risks.
As always, I appreciate your thoughts and opinions. J
first thing in the AM 8ish would be too early for the Queen to be out.
Also leave the whole top part with new queen alone, set asside , steal the brood, add the frames back put the top back on.

Should be ok

GG
 

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I know that you should not disturb a hive with a newly emerged virgin queen until after she has been laying for a while.
Every queen rearing calendar I've looked at has one opening the colony a couple days after you expect her to emerge to check for emerged cells and discard those not emerged. I place cells most weeks on Saturday, expect them to emerge on Monday, then on Wednesday I check mating nucs to confirm they emerged. Any nucs where they didn't, get a fresh cell on the next round come Saturday.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Grozzie, that is the limit of my inspection on new nuc, check that at least one queen cell is properly emerged and then leave 'em be for two weeks. Have a split I made this past Sunday, tomorrow I will check for started queen cells
Then I will wait two weeks and check that some have emerged. Then another two weeks. The waaait is the harrrdest part. Apologies to Tom Petty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Its good to hear contrarian viewpoints. To be clear, this is what I would call an emergency queen, created by the split above the Snelgrove board. I have been taught not to disturb newly emerged queens if possible, especially emergency and supercedure queens.
I prepped everything to go into the mother hive this morning and had to deal with a non bee issue so I didn't get to it. When I got home I got to use the box and frames I had prepared because I discovered a swarm right behind my apiary. Probably the mother hive I wanted to split again. Day late and a dollar short. But I will go ahead in the morning and see if that was the hive that swarmed or if I can go ahead and split it again. J
 

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Sorry, just gotta say I'm in my hives with newly emerged queens all the time, and without incident.
Ruthie, what an experienced beekeeper does and what we recommend to new beekeepers is not necessarily the same thing. I have never rolled a queen that I know of, yet it happens all the time. I do like to let a new queen get laying so that there are eggs in the hive, just in case. And, I take pains not to disturb the hive too much. This season has been weird with queens not starting to lay on schedule and I have had hives I thought were queenless suddenly have a laying queen. With many beekeepers not even able to see eggs, it is a good idea for them to stay out until there are larvae present which they can see. This is what I recommend to all my mentees. With nuc selling season over for me, I can afford now to let the splits be and follow my own advice (as opposed to inspections every three to four days).
 
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