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How far do swarms typically travel from the mother hive before establishing a cluster? I am looking for the max distance and, more importantly, the "average" distance - if there is such a thing. I realize that once the scouts locate a permanent home, the colony may wind up even farther from the mother hive, but for now I am just interested in the distance from mother hive to cluster. Thanks. -James
 

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I have found that most swarms go less than100 yards and cluster up ,they may stay for a day or two or they may move again.weather and wind has a lot to do wiyh how far they may go.bees are mosty all wemon none thank alike.good luck rock.
 

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According to the book, Sideline Beekeeping for Alpaca and Ratite Farmers, Max distance they go is 105.84 meters. Average distance is 20.695m. Recommended distance to put a bait hive is 9.065m from your beeyard with a swarm lure in it and you will catch swarms from your own bees and maybe from other local hives. Just make sure that the bait hive is a minimum of 1.817m above the ground and a maximum of 3.126m above the ground which is the height that a person of your stature should be able to reach from a 1.22m or 1.83m ladder. :D
 

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Fish stick, Im glad you gave us those three decimal points on the distances:D

When the wild hive under my shed swarms, they go into a tree about 10 feet from the hive. They have done it 4 times this year that I know of. (I only got one of them :cry: and it's a great hive) But now I know were to put a trap, down to the mm :)

Thanks for the info.
 

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Fish stick, Im glad you gave us those three decimal points on the distances:D..........Thanks for the info.
ROFLMAO, Jerry. Nothing like good sarcastic wit. Seriously, thanks, all. And FishStix, that IS great info to know.

I "caught" my swarm (now my one and only hive) about 75 feet up in a tulip poplar. There *should* be a mother hive within 100 yards of that, no? I looked around the area with no luck, thus far. I have moved that hive to a distant area about a month ago. However, there are foraging bees in the vicinity of where this one clustered. So, I am thinking there is at least one feral hive in the area. Perhaps two, as most of the bees are "normal" looking while a minority are smaller and much darker (true 'feral' bees?). The nearest known apiary is 1 mile away but bees observed departing the forage area left in the opposite direction of the known apiary.

Sure would like to find a feral hive to tap.

-james
 

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Dixie; how'd you get to that swarm? That's about 65' more than I'm willing to go for a swarm unless it's with a bucket truck. :D
 

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fish stix: it was easy. I had to deeps in the trunk of my car about 100 yards from the swarm tree. Each deep had 10 frames of drawn comb, some with honey. I opened the trunk and within about 2 seconds, scouts from the swarm found it. They returned to the swarm and told the rest about it. I guess they had a town hall meeting and voted to take up residence in the deeps. So, I didn't even need to shinny up that tree. Good thing, too, as I don't shinny so well any more.

The info you posted really did confirm suspicions I had. I need to re-search the area around where the swarm coalesced for some "wild" hives. Also, I may out more traps in that general vicinity ( I have 2, now ) and put at least one near where my hive is currently located, in case my own hive swarms.

BTW, what did you post that was so "political' it had to be deleted? you may PM me, if you want.

-james
 
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