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AFB larvae die after being capped.
EFB larvae die before being capped.
What you describe sounds like EFB or PMS parasitic mite syndrome.
Good Luck
 

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Hello all,

Can anyone advise what's going on here? I do not have this build up at the bottom hive entrance, only at this small opening in the inner cover. Hive seems to be large and healthy.

Thanks!
 

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Hello all,

Can anyone advise what's going on here? I do not have this build up at the bottom hive entrance, only at this small opening in the inner cover. Hive seems to be large and healthy.

Thanks!
Old thread I know but if the staining in the picture in the post above is wax that may be a sign of bees from anouther hive raiding your hive.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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That is not wax, it is bee poop. Hive may have a case of dysentery from noseama a., or just a long time between cleansing flights. Did your hive have that too? Maybe it wasn't mites.
 

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JW, No, I'm not seeing any signs of dysentery. Between the new queen, no brood (my other box has some brood), and the limited number of small bees I suspect my queen died last fall after she had started some "winter bees" and was replaced with a dud queen.

I built some swarm traps and plan on trying my luck this spring.
 

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Picture is not clear enough. Is there any capped brood area with opened cells. EFB larvae mostly die before capping stage, AFB afterwards. Really from what I can see it looks a bit like pollen. If that is a typical frame of the brood area, it is being backfilled with nectar.

Below is a couple pics of EFB
 

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Thanks. The hive swarmed two weeks ago. I was in it this morning doing an inspection. There's no capped larvae at this time and I didn't see any larvae or eggs but it was early so I didn't have good light. Thanks for the input.
Depending on weather for mating flights etc., you could expect several weeks after swarm before you see any new brood in a swarmed colony. That is providing the new queen successfully returned from mating. The first eggs are not easy to spot but developing larvae are. Keep an eye on them to ensure you do have a laying queen, otherwise they will become a "laying worker" colony.
 

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This spring all 3 of my hives that overwintered showed signs of EFB. Being in IL I am able to call my local IL bee inspector and have him come out to review the hives. He took samples and confirmed EFB. I have 4 hives that I have put my third treatment on last sunday. The strongest of the hives showed no signs of continued infection by the second treatment 5 days later. Full patterns of fat C's were found in cells with no slumped larve or missing larve. The sickest of the hives have been slower to respond to the treatment but at last check the areas the queen was laying looked good and clear patterns.

I still have quite a few questions on the treatment of EFB if anyone has dealt with this for a longer period of time.

PS ive been keeping bees since 2008 and this is my first year to ever see EFB in person or have to deal with it personally.
 
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