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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I made a queenless split two days ago since I knew I'd be picking up my new queen today. My home-made push in cage was basically a complete failure. It wasn't pushed in well enough, the wire ends were bending, whatever, the bees found their way in pretty much immediately. There were immerging brood right there at the new queen, and she went and drank up some nectar from a cell before 3, then 5, then 8...bees broke their way in. They weren't aggresive at all, they were licking her all over, and she just stood there and basically took it. It wasn't exactly normal "there's the queen" behavior for my bees who usually ignore their queen, but it certainly didn't appear aggressive to me, no balling, no biting. I watched for probably 10 minutes with her inside the push-in-cage with the other bees and since there were probably 20 bees in there anyway at that point and they were all seemed to not be harming her in any way, I just took my cage off. Should I be concerned that they'll "turn on her" in an hour or something? Or does direct release of a queen into a split sometimes work, I just got lucky, and I should leave them alone now for a while?

Thanks.
 

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Sometimes that does work, yeah. Go back in quickly in a few days/week or so and see what happened. You do not want to disturb them too much, or it is possible they will reject the queen. In future use the press in queen frames from Betterbee. They work swell!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. Good to know they probably won't turn on her.

Does that queen cage have legs all the way around its edge or just one at each corner. One criticism I've read about the plastic queen cages is that they just have a leg at each corner so the bees simply chew out the comb from any place along any edge and they're in. The betterbee site doesn't have a close up picture.

Thanks again.
 

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That is actually a good thing with the cages, as by the time they get to her, she is accepted, and you do not need to tear open the hive again and release her. I use them with great success, and do not bother going back in until much later, at which time I pull them out and re-use them. Just make sure they are pressed in well. I think they might work ok against laying-worker hives, but no experience there. Anyone?
 
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