Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Quick question for the group... Please excuse me if this is the wrong forum--my first post after some time of lurking.

I live in SC on the coast where we just made it through the longest cold snap in memory.

I have several hives that are doing quite well... to the point that I am considering adding a medium super to each. I realize that this move may be a shock to the hives and was wondering if anyone has considered a similar move--temperate climate, nucs packed with bees, considering offering more room in a typically off cycle time period.

Thanks in advance for any feedback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,548 Posts
only someone in you rlocal area could answer truthfully. Here, where we are in the 60's this week, the bees are doing great. No way i would add anything till the end of February...but thats just here. no reason to give them open space unless they are using it. If they are building up, then sure, why wouldn't you. I think its a little early yet IMHO...I could be wrong....well, generally i am wrong..LOLOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
Are you feeding? Or is there something blooming that would prompt the queen to lay? If the hive has not begun to build up, I would not do anything yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,430 Posts
I am from SC and love the beach. But there still will be some very cool nights and its probably 3-5 weeks before any major type of pollen is available. Wouldn't but on another super until the bees are bringing in pollen. Then you will need to feed them to get them to build comb in the foundations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,136 Posts
I put my supers on when I can see some new white comb being built on the brood frames when I take off the cover or inner cover. They are going to put the first honey there anyway.

I have fed to get comb built in the brood boxes but never in honey supers. They won't build the comb without filling the comb with sugar water...which I don't want. They will build comb in the honey supers on the flow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,139 Posts
If you feel they are low on food reserves adding a super full of honey is the best thing to ensure their survival. As far as a shock, if you minimize the time you have the top cover off and don’t do a manipulation that would break or divide the cluster, this will not hurt the bees in anyway. I have performed this operation virtually every winter, in temperatures 0-10 degrees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I fed dry sugar to each and they still have some stores. The girls are arriving with pollen each time I visit the hives, though I can't for the life of me understand where it's coming from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I am from SC and love the beach. But there still will be some very cool nights and its probably 3-5 weeks before any major type of pollen is available. Wouldn't but on another super until the bees are bringing in pollen. Then you will need to feed them to get them to build comb in the foundations.
Thank you. I was on the ledge preparing to execute on an ill conceived plan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
If you feel they are low on food reserves adding a super full of honey is the best thing to ensure their survival. As far as a shock, if you minimize the time you have the top cover off and don’t do a manipulation that would break or divide the cluster, this will not hurt the bees in anyway. I have performed this operation virtually every winter, in temperatures 0-10 degrees.
Thanks, Brent. Sound advise.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top