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I have a thriving hive that just doesn't seem to be producing the amount of honey I would expect, nor do they want to make wax.

Might they have some sort of nosema infection and if so how do I differentiate between N. apis and N. ceranae?

If the latter, which I suspect, how and when should I treat?
 

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Disclaimer: I'm not an expert! I'm the youngest of 3 brothers in the 3rd or 4th generation of family beekeeping. I'll just relay what I've learned from putting into practice.

The difference between the two is which bee it affects. Apis being the euro bees and Ceranae being the asiatic. Nosema, FROM MY EXPERIENCE, is fairly easy to identify. Check the hive(s) inside and, more easily spotted, outside for ALOT of brown bee fecal matter. If you've got nice light colored frames on the inside and see a bunch on there treatment should be applied quickly. Nosema causes the bees to get diarrhea and can be treated with fumagillin-B quite succesfully. We treated our fleet last fall after a hive or two came down with it and so far this year, no probs... touch wood. Fumagillin-B is a powder you mix into their syrup when you make the batch, not just at the hive. I can't find the dosage sheet with our bottle just yet but here's a link I found that confirms some of what I said. http://entomology.ucdavis.edu/faculty/Mussen/beebriefs/Nosema_Disease.pdf

Good luck. Joe
 

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A simple microscopic examination of a sample of older bee's is the best way to diagnose nosema,often no dysentry problems with ceranae,and not a very good method to diagnose nosema with apis either. You can use the same treatment for either,i use emulsified thymolated syrup with exellent results.
 
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