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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When inspecting my second hive today, which is an overwintered hive of Russians, I noticed these queen cells on one of the frames in the bottom deep. I did also find queen cells on the middle/top of another frame that I didn't take a picture of. I cant be sure, but it seemed like there were less bees in my two deeps than I remember. I did find capped brood and larvae in both top and bottom deep, but I am bad at spotting eggs. I did not see the queen, but I'm also bad at spotting her as well. The hive seemed pretty quiet, no "roar" that I noticed.

Do you all think the original queen has swarmed with some of the hive?

If not, should I take that frame with all the queen cells and make up a nuc? Split the hive and divide the frames 50/50?

Need some expert advice please!!!!





This is the frame I was referring to, both sides. Also, why the drone comb on the bottom by the queen cells???
 

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Impossible for us to know for sure if they swarmed or not yet. Regarding what to do, it would depend on your goals. The easiest thing to do is split it 3 or 4 ways and leave each colony with 1 or 2 cells.
 

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Usually the primary swarm leaves as the new queen cells are capped. Secondary swarms occur as the virgin queens emerge. If you do not want to have secondary swarms you need to nuc some of the queen cells or remove all but 1 or two depending on how lucky you feel.
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a nuc box just waiting to be used! Would you recommend taking that frame, along with frames of honey, pollen, capped brood, and larvae and putting 5 total frames in a nuc?
 

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That would work as long as you give them a frame to store honey in, and rotate an empty in and the full one out as they fill it. Queen less bees can store a lot of honey when they do not have brood to feed.
Dave
 

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Another point. If you have the kind of luck I have getting mated queens back in the hive, making a nuc will double your chances of getting a queen for the hive. Be sure you leave at least one cell in the original hive. If you fail to get a mated queen in the nuc or hive just combine with the other.
Dave
 
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