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Split my Warre. Drove bees down with smoke. Took top 2 boxes and put in original location. They were all but empty of bees. Probably 20-30 in each. Some capped brood but unsure if there were eggs available.

Bottom two boxes, full of nurse bees and the queen were moved 6’ away to new location. Put half gallon of feed on them as these were visible brood pattern in both boxes.

3-4 hours later I introduced queen into the queen less hive in original location. She had five nurse bees and her highness behind hard fondant plug. Bees didn’t immediately ball her like I’ve seen, but were bending their abdomens like they wanted to sting. I shut everything up and removed empty cage 4 days later.

Other observation is hive in new position obviously lost all foragers. I’ve observed 2 orientation flights since the split on 6/23. Today is the first day of steady foraging traffic. Requeened hive has not slowed down in traffic..... just 1/30 bringing in pollen.

My question is..... do you think they accepted the new queen? I’d tear into them to see, but I’m worried about damaging a queen cell if they didn’t. Is less pollen a bad sign? When would be safe to tear into it to look for eggs? I bought a dental mirror to try and help.

I believe I’m going to build down into 8 frame equipment next spring. It’d be so much easier to just pull a frame or five and have a look.

Thanks
Mark
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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If there were no eggs in the frames from the top two boxes, you do not need to worry about damaging a queen cell. You know the queen was released, now you just need to verify she is alive and laying. Bees gather pollen based on need. A small number of hatched larvae do not need much yet. Pollen foraging will increase as the amount of brood increases.

I do not use Warre hives so am not sure how difficult inspections are.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I’m not sure if there were eggs available in top two boxes.

My warre hives are semi removable frames. They built some ugly comb across them and I will make a sticky mess if not careful.

I’ll give it another week and have a quick bottom up inspection with my dental mirror.
 

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One issue with what you did maybe - you made the oldest bees queen-less.
It is best to make the young bees queen-less.
However you do it technically - your problem to solve (many options).
But if anything I'd combine the young bees with an outside queen for the best possible acceptance.

Indeed, the original Warre design may present a problem; this is why I am proponent of fully-framed Warre designs.
Finding a queen should be a routine task, not a rocket-building project.
 
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