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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took my first honey last Saturday from hives I've had for over a year now...it tastes delightful! I say that because I don't like the taste of strong flavored honey. Usually when I buy I buy Orange Blossom Honey because it is milder than some of the others. My own bees have given me an even more delicate taste than even the Orange Blossom. I mentioned this to someone and they immediately asked if it was just weak honey? Before I let them burst my bubble, does anyone know if a more delicate honey is a negative rather than a positive? It is a very light golden color, a bit lighter than the Orange Blossom. While my palate may like the taste of my own honey I am just wondering...???

BeeCuz
_________
"For breath is sweeter taken even as the last in places dear...
With gardens, fields and dogwood trees...
In forest stands of bamboo shoots...
Of ginger root and honey bees..."
 

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Never heard of honey that was too weak. If it was capped by the bees, then it would be the proper moisture and consistency. Beyond that, it's just a matter of what flowers the bees visited. Clover honey is considered mild, buckwheat honey is bold. Neither is weak.
 

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Bees cap honey when it hits a moisture content they find suitable. All capped honey is within a range. If there are exceptions there I can't speak to it as I'm pretty new to all this myself.

In terms of your palate, you should enjoy what you enjoy. The same goes foods and wines and so forth. I snuck a tiny cut of comb when inspecting my hive last week and was very surprised by the honey. It was pale and had a distinct lavender flavor (which makes sense given how much is in everyone's front yard around here. Not like any honey I'd had before.

Don't let people talk down what you enjoy :)
 

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The only way I can think of that it would be conisdered "too weak" is if you were feeding sugar syrup while you had your honey supers on.
 

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did you feed them sugar syurp? if it is "weak" tasting i would bet it is sugar syurp mixed in with nectar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The only way I can think of that it would be conisdered "too weak" is if you were feeding sugar syrup while you had your honey supers on.
No...I have not fed them ANY sugar water since I put on the honey supers. I checked with the rest of my family and they like it better than our store bought bottle of Orange Blossom too...so I am happy that we have good honey. I just wondered if there was any general attitude about light vs. dark honey. I am assuming it is just a matter of personal preference. Thanks, guys.
 

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I understand that Chinese Tallow honey is on the "weak" side, that is, with lower sugar content than other honeys, and can risk going bad.

Depending on nectar sources, a honey can be "weak" "thin" "dilute"
 

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Just for curiousity you should maybe buy yourself a scale tester from Dadant & Son's Inc. I seen them on there before, it grades the color! Doesnt cost to much!...here is the link:

https://www.dadant.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=35_68&products_id=754

When it comes that time i wouldnt mind grading my own honey as well! They also have refractometers but they test for moisture. Or if you got the money you can get a Honey Analyzer: Immediate Results Digital Readout No More Judging By Eye The Honey Analyzer measures the percent light transmittance of honey compared to analytical reagent grade glycerol. The primary characteristic for commercial honey classification is color. Color classes are expressed in millimeters (mm) Pfund. Honey color varies naturally in a wide range of tonalities, ranging from light yellow to amber, dark amber and black in extreme cases.

https://www.dadant.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=35_68&products_id=739
 

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We had a pretty good TiTi flow in North Florida. That is probably what you have pulled. The Chinese Tallow (Popcorn) tree is just now putting out it's spurs. Probably 2 weeks to the popcorn flow. I have been told that Popcorn honey tends be a little harder for the bees to dry out, but has a good flavor and the flow is usually pretty strong. Good time for your bees to draw wax.
 

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beecuz, honey taste is simply a matter of personal preference. Some folks like strong and bold, others like mild and delicate. You've ruled out contamination via sugar syrup. Honey is hydroscopic, which means it collects moisture from the air...being in Florida, your humidity can be rather high. If you removed the supers a few days before extracting/harvesting your honey, it is possible the moisture content changed, making it "weak". But if you processed it fairly quickly, you simply have a mild, delicate honey. Not weak, but mild and delicate.

If your later honey is stronger, that gives you an idea of how you'll need to proceed next year. You might want to keep this early honey separate from later honey, thus extract several times to keep your varieties separate. I wish I had your problem!
Regards,
Steven
 

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It is a good idea to extract your spring honey separate from your summer honey here in N. Fl. we get a lighter color honey in the spring and a darker honey later on in the early summer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It is a good idea to extract your spring honey separate from your summer honey here in N. Fl. we get a lighter color honey in the spring and a darker honey later on in the early summer.
Thanks, JohnG - knowing this makes me feel better...looking forward to the next batch!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If your later honey is stronger, that gives you an idea of how you'll need to proceed next year. You might want to keep this early honey separate from later honey, thus extract several times to keep your varieties separate.
Regards,
Steven
Thanks, Steven. I will take your advice and keep the early spring honey separate...looking forward to early summer honey surprise! :)

BeeCuz
 
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