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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the less nice things Europeans brought to my country was wasps. Once here they found wasp paradise with a climate well suited for them, and abundant food. As a result NZ now has more wasps per acre than any other country. They have now become a major pest, and at this time of year (it's fall here), there is more tonnage of wasps per acre in the bush, than the total of all other insects, birds, and mammals combined.
They can build up to huge numbers and overwhelm even healthy hives just by sheer weight of numbers. We now have an effective poison bait for them designed specifically for wasps. They carry it home and feed it to their larvae, which die. Wasps do not waste anything they are cannibals, and the dead larvae are eaten by the adults, plus may be fed to other larvae. In this way a relatively small amount of bait can kill and entire nest.
Here in the video I am administering some vespex to a bee yard in danger.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Tigger, it was several years in development, not so much to kill wasps which is easy enough, but to find a formulation that is not attractive to anything else, especially bees. The bees have no interest in it.

Best I know it is not available in the US. However if you want to do a home made version, the active ingredient is Fiprinol, so you can mix some fiprinol into some munched up sardines and you have a cheap version. Fiprinol is a commonly used ingredient in flea tube things that you put on your cat. Because fiprinol is a pesticide it has to be listed on the label. So you go to the supermarket and check the label on those little tube things you put on the cat for fleas, if it lists fiprinol as an active ingredient you are good to go.

The reason fiprinol is the perfect pesticide for wasps is it is non repellant, the wasps don't detect it. It also kills very slowly. Which means the wasps have time to get it home, feed it and spread it around, before it kills them.

Only caveat, don't put any sugar or anything to attract bees into your bait. Fiprinol is just as deadly to bees as it is wasps.
 

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Hi Tigger, it was several years in development, not so much to kill wasps which is easy enough, but to find a formulation that is not attractive to anything else, especially bees. The bees have no interest in it.

Best I know it is not available in the US. However if you want to do a home made version, the active ingredient is Fiprinol, so you can mix some fiprinol into some munched up sardines and you have a cheap version. Fiprinol is a commonly used ingredient in flea tube things that you put on your cat. Because fiprinol is a pesticide it has to be listed on the label. So you go to the supermarket and check the label on those little tube things you put on the cat for fleas, if it lists fiprinol as an active ingredient you are good to go.

The reason fiprinol is the perfect pesticide for wasps is it is non repellant, the wasps don't detect it. It also kills very slowly. Which means the wasps have time to get it home, feed it and spread it around, before it kills them.

Only caveat, don't put any sugar or anything to attract bees into your bait. Fiprinol is just as deadly to bees as it is wasps.
There were as many wasps there as there are gnats where I'm from. YIPES!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, what you have in the US according to what I have watched on youtube and you call yellowjackets, are very similar to what we have, but not quite the same. And yes our ones do get big nests. Where they originated from in Europe the winters are cold, but here the nests sometimes survive winter, and if that happens they come through in spring with hundreds of queens that were supposed to hibernate but didn't, and the nests can get big with millions of wasps.
 

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but here the nests sometimes survive winter, and if that happens they come through in spring with hundreds of queens that were supposed to hibernate but didn't, and the nests can get big with millions of wasps.
This is the correct answer in that situation

62356
 
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