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So this is really just me expressing my bummedness (thats a word right?).... I had a hive that wasn't doing real well. Bought a hygentic "Pol Lin" queen from california (marked) and installed her. Hive accepted her and she was laying like a mad woman. I was so proud. I checked on her and the hive July 2nd and all looked like it was coming along nicely. I left her for 9 days and checked again... NO queen around and the bees had 1 queen cell going. I looked in the queen cell and there was a large larvae. I think I must have somehow killed my marked queen. Though honestly I'm not sure how. I found her in the middle of a nice frame of brood, put it back in carefully, and slid it over to where it was. I know I didn't roll her. Oh well, I'm just feeling guilty and bummed about it and wanted to vent. The good news is that they have a new queen from her line going. I hope she's able to get mated well. There aren't that many hives (that I know of) around.
 

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Perhaps you did kill/damage the queen. It is also very probable they superceded the queen. It is somewhat common for bees to supercede new queens. Who knows why really.

Shane
 

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We've all been there, good buddy.

I hear the good news for you is that the world is full of bummers, the number increasing greatly, the further one gets from Missoula, Montana (paraphrased from "A river Runs Through It").
 

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If it is common for bees to supercede a new mated Queen is it worth checking once a week to remove Queen Cells? Will they eventually just give up and accept the Queen given them?
 

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@ WBVC - If the bees are superceding a queen, there is a reason for it. Remember, they are VERY good judges of her, we only THINK we are. They may raise only one supercedure cell and take superb care of it. The main problem they have is when it gets late in the season - can they risk the time and slowed brood production? Mama is often left alive to lay eggs until daughter queen is mated. In these situations, many times, hives have had more than one laying queen, so they are not hurt for population late in the year.

I'd let the bees supersede unless it was an I.I. queen (or other valuable queen) that cost a lot and I was trying to change to her genetic line. If they are just production bees, I let them supercede.
 

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If it is common for bees to supercede a new mated Queen is it worth checking once a week to remove Queen Cells? Will they eventually just give up and accept the Queen given them?
If the bees make supercedure cells, I don't mess with them. If I find swarm cells, I will use some of the surplus cells for splits.

Shane
 

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I been there too.
I now longer buy queens, I notch frames and raise my own.
anyway, a month or so back i put a queen cell in a nuc. went back to check it and the queen had hatched. cool
anyway somehow while i was messing around in the nuc, i squished the queen. I literally could have kicked myself for doing it and should have known better than to mess with the nuc. i knew she was hatched and not yet laying.
arggh.

g.
 

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Man don't be too hard on yourself. I killed a II Poline breeder last month. Now I've got to shell out another $250 to get another one. I'm still nauseated.
 

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Bummer about your queen,

What do you mean by "notch frames"?

Thanks
Shane
I pull out a frame with eggs in it.
i put my hive too into the bottom 1/3 of a row of cells as wide as my hive tool and press the bottom of the comb downwards. that creates vertical cells.

Do this a couple of times on a frame and put the frame back into the hive.

Bees draw these as queen cells.

You can read about it if you do a google search for "OTS Queen Rearing" thats "On The Spot"



G.
 

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I pull out a frame with eggs in it.
i put my hive too into the bottom 1/3 of a row of cells as wide as my hive tool and press the bottom of the comb downwards. that creates vertical cells.

Do this a couple of times on a frame and put the frame back into the hive.

Bees draw these as queen cells.

You can read about it if you do a google search for "OTS Queen Rearing" thats "On The Spot"



G.
Thanks,

That sounds very simple.

Shane
 

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Thanks,

That sounds very simple.

Shane
Sorry for the hasty reply, just finished work and wanted to get out the door.

here is a must watch video on the topic of OTS queen rearing.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIYz65Vquxg

I took Three things away from this video.
1) for honey production. one week before swarm season in your area, remove the queen from your production hive and start a nuc with her. notch a frame in the production hive so they can make a new queen. this can help prevent swarming as you have already done it for them.

2) for making increase. one week before swarm season in your area, remove the queen from your production hive and start a nuc with her. depending on how many frames of brood you have notch every second frame a couple of times. then come back in x days and split the whole hive into nucs using one notched frame per nuc.

3) brood break.

Ideas 1 and 2 both utilize a full production hive as the cell starter and finisher.

G.
 
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