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If the correct amount of sugar is used per box and the right method is used, it is not supposed affect open brood. Some beekeepers have sprayed it into the cells, [a reasonable amount] only as an experiment, without noticeable problems.

"Aliano, N and MD Ellis (2005) Only large amounts of powdered sugar applied directly to brood cells harms immature honey bees. J Apic Res 44(1): 33-35" >>
http://www.scientificbeekeeping.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=72

Another reference: http://www.epa.gov/pesp/regional_grants/2001/r7-2001-final.htm
 

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Any dust or powder can dry out a lavae if enough gets on it.
Mel Disselkoen has been using this fact to raise queens.

Quote:

In the Case-Hopkins method when I would put the frame insert horizontally on the cell builder they would rear queen cells wherever they wanted. This means that they would join them together and make it inconvenient for removal. When I smashed the comb leaving one row out of three there was a mess, especially if honey was in the comb. It was also difficult to use the comb over again. There had to be a better, faster, and neater way to kill larvae. After several experiments, I discovered that common wheat flour (the kind you use to bake or make a pollen supplement) will gum up the larvae making it impossible for the nurse bees to care for them. By covering every third cell with something to protect the larvae, such as bullets or cotton swabs, I could prepare a comb with larvae spaced just right. I can put 100 bullets on a comb in three minutes and then the shaking of the flour takes only 15 seconds. This proved to be fast, neat, and I could use the comb over again.

http://www.mdasplitter.com/docs/IMN BOOKLET.pdf

Mel's site http://www.mdasplitter.com/
 
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