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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My two hives started from Nuc's last year did not make it through the winter. I am in Central Illinois, and they did great till all the sub-zero weather hit. I opened them today to take a look. It looks like they starved with a lot of stores still capped. In the location of the clusters there was lots of bees with butts sticking out of the cups. Only six inches away was capped and un-capped honey. I am going to clean out the hives this weekend and have new packages arriving early mid April. Can I leave the frames of comb and stores in the hives till then?

Thanks
 

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I had the same thing happen to me last year. I stuck the deeps, including all frames, into a deep freezer for at least a week, probably longer. I wanted to make sure that all the hive beetles/other anti-bee friendly pests were dead as well. I wouldn't leave them as is just because you don't want something else stealing or destroying what you have left.

The good news out of this is that your incoming packages will have a huge boost. Good luck and don't give up.
 

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http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?290641-My-recipe-method-for-sugar-blocks

GOHoney, I have copied Lauri's methods, and they work for me. Admittedly, I live in a warm world, compared to yours. I also have a clear plastic inner cover so that I can check on my hives on cold, windy, rainy days without disturbing the heat balance. If needed I could slip a new dampened sugar block in there, and would in a blizzard if needed! In fact, if I lived in a cold country I would go to nine frames in winter to give easy access to the cluster to the sugar. You may already use this method, if not, give it a try, Lauri has developed a workable method and presented it very well.
I also think it is needed to maintain bee space under the block over the top of the top of the frames so the cluster can maintain contact there and move from side to side without going around the edges of the comb, which I think they will not do in the cold.
All this is just my opinion developed thru some doing, a lot of reading and following BeeSource. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Blessed Farms. I was thinking I should put the in the freezer till needed. I have also built three more hives and have a total of three packages and two Nuc's coming this spring. If all works out I will have 5 hives this year.
 

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In your area I would say yes. I doubt you will be seeing any wax moth or small hive beetles flying this early. I would duct tape the entrances and any cracks and crevices though to seal it up and to keep other bees from robbing out your combs of the valuable feed honey and pollen. Don't worry about the dead bees in cells. The new tenants can clean it out easier than you can and there are thousands of them needing jobs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you Vance G. Glad to hear that, It looked like a daunting task getting all of them out of there.
 
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