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Hi All,
I could use some advice. I noticed today that even though it is late October (unusually warm fall) there were quite a few wasps agressivley trying to enter my hives. I had reduced the entrances a few days ago to about 4 inches but the top covers were left propped open slightly for ventilation. I saw wasps also entering the hives at this top entrance. So, I have reduced the entrances further to about 1 inch and closed the top covers. I saw bees fighting with wasps and dragging them out of the hives. The other thing I noticed today was several dead bees (many are fuzzy babies) and a couple of pupae that were dragged out of one hive. The thing that makes me wonder if these deaths are a result of the wasps is that most were still in one piece when they were removed. Any thoughts? Is this common evidence of wasp damage? I could see no evidence of deformity and the mite levels aren't too bad now (although they were a fee weeks ago).
Thank you
Q
 

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I would think that if it is wasp damage...the pupae would be carried away. Usually wasp will eat bees...at least that is my experience. It may be some kind of hygenic behavior or a population control, but I don't know enough about either one of those to comment intelligently.
 

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I would think that if it is wasp damage...the pupae would be carried away. Usually wasp will eat bees...at least that is my experience. It may be some kind of hygenic behavior or a population control, but I don't know enough about either one of those to comment intelligently.
Thanks Gold,
I would agree, but maybe the wasps were killed by the bees before they could leave the hive with those pupae or eat them. ... I am hoping! I hope that by shutting down the access to the hive in a couple of days the wasps will have moved on. Then maybe I'll see if they are still dragging bodies out. I would prefer not to open the hive to inspect when it's so chilly out, but I will have to take a look if it continues.
 

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I have always had what I consider "Wasp problems" at this time of year...but I usually have reducers on at this time of year and let the bees take care of it...If you consider a wild hive, they have to deal with wasp throughout the fall of the year...We have yellow jackets and some kind of large red wasps with a yellow face that seems to be the biggest problems, but it seems as if the bees are holding there own just fine...even my smallest (not weak but small) hive are faing just fine.
 
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